Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

The Psychology Of The Gifted Athlete

There are thousands of parents in the Hicksville area who have a secret hope that their young girl or boy may be the next Tiger Woods, Taylor Swift or Michael Jordan. And as a sport psychologist I know the amount of money these families spend on this dream. It is not unusual for a family to invest upwards of 30 to 40 thousand dollars every year on things like lessons, training, coaching, tutors, equipment, gym time and travel teams. And I understand why they do this. Organized sport is a safe pastime for their kids and it keeps them away from trouble. In addition sports are very exciting both for the kids and the watchful parents. And a more practical reason for the investment of time and money in a child’s sport or artistic activity is that it may lead to scholarship money in college. Given the exorbitant cost of a college education this becomes a crucial issue.

So the question that begs to be answered is this: Is the investment of time and money and energy worth it? Is your child talented enough and impassioned enough to benefit from this support? This is a legitimate and worthwhile issue to explore.

Over the years I have worked with many gifted young athletes and performers and here is what I have learned about them. Some get scholarships and some do become professionals but only if they have the following traits.

1) They appear to be obsessed with their sport or their art. They will winningly spend long hours practicing by themselves. The future pro will show us that they like to play their sport or art form up to six hours per day while the normal kid will spend about 6 hours per week on their game.

2) They have an extreme ability to focus on their sport and concentrate for long hours without pausing.

3) They are willing to practice in isolation and without the need of company. Pete Sampras, the greatest tennis player who ever held a racket would hit balls against his basement wall for hours from the time he was three years of age all by himself without the need for company.

4) These kids tend to be very sensitive and ethical and empathic to others and they are often shy.

5) They will naturally be perfectionistic and hard on themselves, demanding greater and greater excellence. The singer Madonna is known for her incredible demandingness and need to perform to perfection. So was Larry Bird the basketball star.

6) They are ambitious, understand they have ability and hold fast to a dream of future success. As a child Tiger Woods placed a picture of Jack Nicklaus on his wall and set his goal on beating Nicklaus’ record of winning 18 majors.

7) The gifted athlete or performer tends toward depression given their extreme sense of perfectionism and tendency to be isolated and introspective.

So if you have a youngster in the home who loves fencing or soccer or cartoon illustration or golf or tennis or guitar you may or may not have a gifted child. And if they demonstrate the traits listed above they may in fact be headed to the top and you can be assured that your investment of time and money will be worth it.

Dr. Tom Ferraro is a noted sport, business psychologist and journalist located in Mid-Nassau County and can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

News

You could say Darren Butler has quite the entrepreneurial disposition. The Hicksville resident not only founded a church, but invented a doorstop that does not require screwing any holes into your wall or door. The device simply clamps on to the bottom of any sized door without requiring tools.

“I never envisioned myself as being an inventor,” explained Butler. “I became one by accident and out of frustration.”

After Butler and his wife purchased their home, they wanted to decorate and maintain it.  “We have four children and at the time we wanted to minimize the damage that occurs from doors slamming into walls because as young children do; they have a tendency to aggressively open doors, and as a result the door knob created holes in our wall,” said Butler. “We purchased conventional doorstops so at the very least we could minimize that reality if not eliminate it all together.”

The Hicksville Fire Department hosted the Nassau County Parade and Drill Championships this past Saturday, an event that was entertaining for both guests and participants.

The Motorized Drill competition held in the morning had 16 participating fire departments. The drill included eight events and each racing team was judged based on how fast they completed each event. Events included the Three Man Ladder, Motor Hook and Ladder, Motor Hose, Efficiency, Motor Pump, and Buckets. The Hicksville Hicks came in fifth place and received a trophy.


Sports

Madeline Huffman, a fourth grade student at Our Lady of Mercy School in Hicksville, recently became the New York State Free Throw Champion in the Knights of Columbus Free Throw Competition, 9 Year Old Girls Division at the United States Military Academy, West Point.

Huffman’s journey to the state championship began at her home parish, Our Lady of Mercy Roman Catholic Church in January. The local qualifier was sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Joseph F. Lamb Council #5723. Boys and girls ages 9 through 14 competed, each receiving three warm up shots and 15 free throw attempts.

This November, Hicksville resident Marlo Signoracci will head to Florida for Ironman, a demanding, long-distance triathlon that includes biking, running and swimming. Here, she shares her story as she prepares for one of the most physically challenging athletic events out there.

“I meet my goals and maintain my health. I stay mindful of what is important to me and seek balance in all endeavors. With gratitude, I am fully present to this moment in time.”


Calendar

Hicksville Street Fair

July 20

Blood Drive

July 23

Our Lady Of Mercy Family Festival

July 30 - August 3



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com