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Hot Dog Lovers Relish At Linda’s

Linda Doyle knows how to make a good hot dog. And she doesn’t need a big fancy kitchen or shiny barbeque grill to do it. Rather, Doyle’s famous franks are served out of a small trailer on the side of S. Broadway.

For the past 16 years, passers-by coming along S. Broadway looking for a delicious, cheap bite to eat for lunch or a pre-dinner snack have been stopping by Linda’s Hot Dog Boutique, a simple white trailer adorned by a flag, yellow umbrella and two signs.

From her small trailer, Doyle offers a sociable smile and sausages, knishes, homemade macaroni salad, cookies, chips and drinks. And of course there are the hot dogs. Doyle uses Sabrett natural casing hot dogs (“the expensive kind, not the cheap ones,” she says), which you can top with onions, relish, ketchup and mustard.

Doyle bought the boutique in November 1998. At the time she was a lecturer for a weight club, and one of her members had a hot dog trailer. Her interest was sparked after stopping by his trailer one day, and that same week, she found an ad in the paper for a hot dog trailer in Hicksville.

“I bought it for $11,000 and I’ve been here ever since,” she says.

Doyle says the appeal for her was having a business she could call her own. She’s held a variety of jobs in the past, from selling custom jewelry wholesale to being a real estate agent, and says she enjoys doing things for herself.

“I love being my own boss and not having anyone telling me what to do,” says Doyle. “I like being able to do my own thing. Being your own boss is the best aspect.”

Besides being in charge, Doyle says she also loves interacting with customers. They come from the medical center next door, nearby car dealerships, repair shops, the VFW, the high school and around the neighborhood.

“It’s a small operation, but it’s nice talking to people and having customers,” Doyle says. “Everyday is different. Sometimes you get a lot of people at once, other times you sit and wait a while. And there’s not that many hot dog places around so being here so many years, you get to know a lot of people.”

One of her more notable customers came along two years ago. It was just a regular day at the boutique when someone approached Doyle about doing an interview. She agreed and they came back later with a microphone, saying they wanted to tape a couple talking to her.

“I was talking to this lady and her husband about some things. Everyone from the surrounding businesses was watching this, but I had no idea who she was,” says Doyle. “And then she says ‘I’m a medium’ and starts talking to me about my past. Meanwhile, I had no idea it was Theresa Caputo. Everyone knew who she was but I had no idea, it was hysterical.”

It’s not every day that Doyle has local celebrities visiting her boutique, but she does have her loyal customers. She says she’s seen some of them grow up and have their own kids who they bring to the boutique.  

With a three hot dogs for $5 deal, Doyle says it’s the “cheapest deal in town.” However, she says business has declined over the years, which she attributes to the economy and people becoming more health conscious.

“People don’t eat as many hot dogs as they used to,” Doyle says. “I don’t think hot dogs will ever go out of style, but people might be eating less of them.”

Doyle says that while she has enjoyed running the boutique these past 16 years, she is looking to sell it.

“I want to be more flexible to travel,” she says. “But I’ll be here until it’s sold.”

Linda’s Hot Dog Boutique is at 320 S. Broadway, by the parking lot of the William M. Gouse Jr. VFW Post 3211. It is open rain or shine from Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

News

Rhea Manjrekar traded in her running shoes and track shorts for high heels and an evening gown recently, as she participated in the Miss Teen India New York pageant. The 15-year-old from Hicksville snagged the title of first-runner up, and will be competing for the national title in December. 

 

This was Manjrekar’s first time competing in a pageant. But she started out with major doubts about even participating. 

 

 “At first, I didn’t want to do it. I have extreme stage fright. My mom told me to try it out because she thought it would boost my confidence and look good on my college applications, so I went for the practice,” Manjrekar said. “The girls were so nice. I thought I wouldn’t fit in but I made friends immediately so I decided to do it.” 

The parking lot of Sears in Hicksville transformed into a sea of cars this past Saturday as part of the ninth annual Long Island Cruizin’ For A Cure Car Show. 

 

The show, which was founded by Jericho prostate cancer survivor Sandy Kane, is the only car show on Long Island dedicated to raising funds for research, testing and also education for early detection of prostate cancer. The all-volunteer car show usually draws around 4,000 attendees. It features 600 cars, trucks, motorcycles and more; a perfect day for car enthusiasts and the like.


Sports

This November, Hicksville resident Marlo Signoracci will head to Florida for Ironman, a demanding, long-distance triathlon that includes biking, running and swimming. Here, she shares her story as she prepares for one of the most physically challenging athletic events out there.

 

If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you! 

At 6 a.m. on a blustery Saturday morning 1,600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay triathlon and tri- relay race. The participants were from all over Long Island, some from upstate NY, a few from out of state and were all ages and some even with disabilities but all came with one goal in mind, to finish.

The course starts out as a half mile swim in Oyster Bay Harbor, then a 9.3 mile bike ride through Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, and Cove neck which is very hilly but finishes with a 2.9 mile downhill to the finish. Then the riders have one more leg of the race which is 3.2 mile run through Mill Neck and Brookville, up to Planting Fields Arboretum and back down to Roosevelt Park to the finish line.


Calendar

Board of Ed Meeting - September 17

Back To School Night - September 18

Pasta Dinner Fundraiser - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com