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Library Explores The Arts And Crafts Era

The simple yet iconic style of the Arts and Crafts Era was highlighted at a recent art lecture held at the Hicksville Public Library.

Art historian Louise Cella Caruso presented the lecture titled the Arts and Crafts Movement in America. Caruso holds many art lectures throughout Nassau County, all of which are self-made and researched.

This lecture highlighted architecture and furniture created during the arts and crafts movement, which occurred in the early 20th century.

“Many people don’t realize that arts and crafts was a major movement and it still impacts the world today,” said Caruso.

This movement focused not only on the products, but also the maker and process of creating.

Prior to the Arts and Crafts Movement, the Victorian Era had lost the simplicity and passion of life in the clutter of over-decorating explained Caruso. In comparison, this movement simplified and gave dignity and usefulness to simple designs, with quality workmanship.

The lecture highlighted some of the most well-known architects of the movement including Frank Lloyd Wright. One of his most famous homes created in that time period included the home Fallingwater, located in Mill Run, Pennsylvania.

The house was built on top of a waterfall for the Kaufman family who employed Wright to build the prairie style house. Caruso explained how the house blended into the organic surroundings and was astride with the waterfall, making for a beautiful sight.

Inside the house, there is a suspended staircase that is enclosed by glass in the winter, but in the summertime the glass moves back to allow the sun to shine in.

“It was very innovative and very bold at the time,” explained Caruso.

A regular at Caruso’s lectures, Oyster Bay resident Frances Addazio, enjoyed hearing about the architecture of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She was most fascinated with prairie style houses and how elaborate they were. “They reminded me of German homes or something you would see in Switzerland,” said Addazio.

While covering the furniture aspect of the movement, Caruso spoke of Gustav Stickley, who was the most successful in his craft. He developed a furniture empire with a style free of ornamentation and excessive design. His style focused on simplicity, individuality and dignity. This work was practical, unadventurous, and with good taste.

One of the most recognizable pieces of work of the Arts and Crafts Movement was the Morris chair. Stickley borrowed this prominent form of design from England and brought it to America. The Morris chair is reclinable, comfortable and adjustable. To this day, Morris chairs are collected and sold for thousands of dollars.

Addazio recognized some of the furniture designs shown in the lecture. “The work almost reminds me of things I see in other people’s homes now,” she commented. “I don’t think they really have any idea where the origin came from.”

The style from the Arts and Crafts Movement is still around to this day, and the designs are a daily reminder of the quest for design that was as enjoyable to create, as it was to use and live off of.

News

Local veterans groups and residents gathered at Hicksville Middle School Veterans Memorial Park recently to honor brave servicemen and woman, past and present. William M. Gouse Jr. Post 3211 hosted Hicksville’s annual Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11.

The ceremonies began with the pledge and national anthem sung by Hicksville High School student Cassie Pursoo, accompanied by trumpeter Conner Hoelzer. Monsignor Thomas Costa from Our Lady of Church in Hicksville gave the invocation.

On Nov. 10, a dedication ceremony was held to celebrate the completion of a beautiful new two-story house in Hicksville. However, while new dwellings are an ordinary occurrence on Long Island, this one was unique and special in a way that very few are.

The house at 77 Thorman Ave. was built in memory of Navy Lieutenant and posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Michael P. Murphy, a Long Island native who tragically died in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2005. However, this house represents more than just the dedicated service of a man to his country; it represents the beginning of a new life full of hope for a brother-in-arms and his family as well.


Sports

Football was Mike Torrellas’ heart and soul. He also liked a good Turkey Bowl.  

Unfortunately, the Hicksville Crusaders co-founder wasn’t able to witness the program’s inaugural event, which took place Saturday, Nov. 8.

Torrellas passed away suddenly last December due to a blood clot, but the spirit and drive of the man who wore the number 53 and tragically passed at that age still surrounds the Crusaders football program.

The Long Island Fight for Charity will be hosting its 11th annual Charity Boxing Event on Nov. 24 at the Hilton in Melville. Among the 20 volunteers putting up their fists for funds will be Hicksville business owner Mell Goldman, who will be fighting under the nickname “The Kid.”  

Goldman is the President of All Boro Cleaning Services. He stated that he was enticed at the opportunity and wanted to contribute to charity.


Calendar

Fall Drama Production

November 20-22

Blood Drive

November 24

Christmas Holiday Fair

November 24



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