Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Meditation In Ink And Color

Hicksville library’s new exhibit looks to the East

East Asian brush painting is a style of art that developed in East Asia, based primarily on Chinese calligraphy. Terry Kimmel has been practicing this art form for decades, and pieces in her gallery range in age from 20 years to just a few weeks old.

Kimmel’s exhibition of paintings using ink and color on rice paper is currently on display at the Hicksville Public Library. About two dozen of her works line the walls of the library’s community room. The paintings of flowers, landscapes, fish and some abstract images will be shown throughout February.

“What’s so unique about this work is that when you’re using ink, it cannot be changed,” said Kimmel. “It’s immediate, it’s spontaneous, it’s direct, and it requires a great deal of concentration. If you’re using oil paint, you can go back to your painting the next day and make changes. You cannot do that with ink paintings.”

The type of brush used for East Asian brush paintings has a wooden, usually bamboo, handle and the brush is made of animal hairs that are very long and taper to a fine point.

“You can use one brush to make an entire painting,” said Kimmel. “The tip of the brush gives you a very fine line, and if you apply more pressure, you have a thicker line. It’s a different way of working.”

“Painting for me is very calming. I can almost say it’s a ‘meditation in ink’ because this way of painting requires so much concentration,” she said. “It is a way of meditating and relaxing.”

Kimmel, who is from Roslyn Estates, has also exhibited her work in group shows at the Manhasset Public Library and in the gallery at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Shelter Rock.

“I have some upcoming exhibits,” she said. “Next month, I am going to exhibit smaller works at the Bethpage Public Library. In April, I’m going to exhibit a floral and spring theme at a restaurant.”

Kimmel has had a passion for art since she was very young. After graduating from New York City’s High School of Music and Art, she enrolled into Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs. Kimmel originally majored in Mathematics, but switched to graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Fine Arts.

“I decided to switch my major because after studying art so extensively in high school I wanted to continue,” she said.

And continue she did, teaching painting, art history and art appreciation for almost 20 years at LaGuardia Community College, from which she retired.

When not painting, Kimmel enjoys reading, gardening and walking.

“I enjoy nature, which is another reason why I enjoy East Asian paintings, because the subject is primarily nature,” she said. “It gives me a way of seeing nature and my surroundings differently. It helps me appreciate each day a little bit more.”

News

Sabina Lotlikar never imagined she’d find herself competing in a pageant. The 19-year-old from Hicksville was more used to spending her time cooking, playing video games and working out than walking in heels in front of hundreds of people. But that all changed this year when Lotlikar decided to compete in the Miss LI pageant, an experience she describes as unforgettable.

“It was so nerve-wracking because I’ve never done anything like this, but I’m so glad I went through it and was dedicated to it. It was amazing,” she says.

When it comes to photography, it’s been a long road for Hicksville’s John Micheals. What started as a hobby in childhood, has now returned as an irreplaceable form of self expression.

“It’s a way of expressing myself. I’m very comfortable with it. It’s a way of expressing myself and being me without any qualifications,” he said.

Micheals’ journey in photography started with snapping pictures with a Kodak as a kid growing up in Queens. As an undergrad at City College of New York, he took art classes and his photography took a back seat as he became an art teacher. When he retired in 1996, he picked up the camera again, taking classes at Nassau Community College and getting his certificate in photography. He dropped photography again when family priorities arose, and got behind the lens again in 2009.  


Sports

The fields of Kevin Kolm Memorial Park were filled with nearly 200 soccer players on Saturday for the annual ‘Soccer For A Cause’ event. The event was put together by the Mastermind Unit in sponsor of the Michael Magro Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to assisting pediatric patients with cancer and their families.

“The Mastermind Unit is a non-profit organization that was founded by a group of guys who grew up playing soccer together in Hicksville,” said co-founder Bryan Alcantara. “This is our seventh annual  ‘Soccer For A Cause’ event at Memorial Park.”

Cantiague Park Senior Men’s Golf League had its fourth tournament on Thursday, July 17. We had 34 golfers and only three who scored under 40. Low overall score was won by Charlie Hong with an impressive 34. Joe Sander scored a solid 49 and won low overall net with a 31.

Competition on the nine-hole course is divided into two divisions. Flight A is for players with a handicap of 13 or lower. Flight B is for players with a handicap of 14 or more. The league is a 100% handicap league. Any man 55 years or older is eligible for membership. We have many openings for this year, and you can sign up anytime throughout the the season. The league meets every Thursday at 7:30 a.m., but the formal tournament dates are only the first and third Thursday of the month through late October. We will have a final luncheon with prizes on our last meeting.


Calendar

Personality Disorders

August 25

Adventures in Genealogy

September 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com