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Get Out Your Wands

Tricky Business won’t be

disappearing anytime soon

John Reid, owner of Tricky Business, is holding five folded dollar bills in his hand.

“Watch the bills closely,” he says.

He suddenly flips the bills over, and they’re all hundreds. He counts them, folds them, flips them over again and they’re singles again.

“Don’t worry, you’re not going crazy,” he says with a smile.

For the past 30 years, Reid been doing magic tricks, captivating crowds of all ages with card tricks, disappearing acts, illusions and more. His East Meadow store, Tricky Business, is a magic emporium, where magic lovers can come buy tricks as well as learn new skills.

Though nowadays, he performs around the world, Reid’s beginning years in magic were spent doing tricks in his room by himself. Reid was seven years old when he got a Fischer Price magic set from his grandmother for Christmas. He loved doing magic tricks, but as an introvert, was self-conscious about performing.

“I would do tricks, but never show anyone what I was doing,” he said.

Through his teen years, he continued to foster his love of magic, but never did tricks for an audience. After graduating from Holy Trinity High School, he went to the New York Institute of Technology to study architecture, and one day was in the cafeteria doing a card trick for a friend, who asked Reid to perform at his nephew’s birthday party. At the party, someone else asked Reid if he would do another event. Suddenly, Reid found himself making his hobby a side job and realized he could make it a living.

Making a full time career out of doing magic tricks seemed impossible but Reid said he didn’t allow himself another option.

“Everyone says you should have a backup plan, but if you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else?” Reid said.  

He opened his first shop in East Northport in 2003, before moving to a location in Hicksville, and then to East Meadow, which is where he’s been for the past three years. His store, located at 2590 Hempstead Turnpike, looks unassuming from the outside, but inside, is a magician’s paradise. Perfect for magicians of all skill levels, Tricky Business sells kits, tricks, props, and of course, plenty of playing card decks. The space also has a classroom in the back, where the shop regularly hosts magic classes and lectures.

Reid says that most magicians are introverts and that he enjoys helping kids get out of their homes and into a more social environment where he can teach them new skills and tricks.  

“The store is a place where I can get younger kids who are interested in magic into a real social environment and help them through their tricks and posture,” Reid said. “It’s a way for me to give back. The more I help a kid, the more it helps me in the end.

For many, the appeal of magic is the power it can have, letting people into an exclusive club of knowing the secrets behind a trick. For Reid, it was the psychology of the art that fascinated him.

“I thought it was interesting how a magician could make a person think one thing, while the reality was something else,” Reid says.

Reid is also a skilled “balloon twister.” But Reid’s creations aren’t just your regular dogs, swords and crowns. His life size balloon creations include recreations of the DeLorean from Back to the Future, a 22 foot ship for Disney Cruises, and dresses. Him and the other six balloon twisters at Tricky Business, can also be seen making balloon creations in restaurants in Hicksville, Carle Place and East Meadow.  

Reid has traveled all over the world, entertaining international audiences with his magic. He’s performed at the White House’s July Fourth celebrations the past five years, has been on Martha Stewart’s show and done birthday parties for the children of celebrities. But at the end of the day, the thing he loves most about magic is how happy it makes people.

“I get to make people smile for a living. I wake up in the morning and my goal is to make the world a happier place,” Reid said. “When I do a trick or make a balloon animal for a kid and see that look in their eyes, it’s the greatest feeling in the world.”

For more information, or to book Tricky Business to perform at your next event, visit www.trickybiz.com.

News

Local veterans groups and residents gathered at Hicksville Middle School Veterans Memorial Park recently to honor brave servicemen and woman, past and present. William M. Gouse Jr. Post 3211 hosted Hicksville’s annual Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11.

The ceremonies began with the pledge and national anthem sung by Hicksville High School student Cassie Pursoo, accompanied by trumpeter Conner Hoelzer. Monsignor Thomas Costa from Our Lady of Church in Hicksville gave the invocation.

On Nov. 10, a dedication ceremony was held to celebrate the completion of a beautiful new two-story house in Hicksville. However, while new dwellings are an ordinary occurrence on Long Island, this one was unique and special in a way that very few are.

The house at 77 Thorman Ave. was built in memory of Navy Lieutenant and posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Michael P. Murphy, a Long Island native who tragically died in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2005. However, this house represents more than just the dedicated service of a man to his country; it represents the beginning of a new life full of hope for a brother-in-arms and his family as well.


Sports

Football was Mike Torrellas’ heart and soul. He also liked a good Turkey Bowl.  

Unfortunately, the Hicksville Crusaders co-founder wasn’t able to witness the program’s inaugural event, which took place Saturday, Nov. 8.

Torrellas passed away suddenly last December due to a blood clot, but the spirit and drive of the man who wore the number 53 and tragically passed at that age still surrounds the Crusaders football program.

The Long Island Fight for Charity will be hosting its 11th annual Charity Boxing Event on Nov. 24 at the Hilton in Melville. Among the 20 volunteers putting up their fists for funds will be Hicksville business owner Mell Goldman, who will be fighting under the nickname “The Kid.”  

Goldman is the President of All Boro Cleaning Services. He stated that he was enticed at the opportunity and wanted to contribute to charity.


Calendar

Fall Drama Production

November 20-22

Blood Drive

November 24

Christmas Holiday Fair

November 24



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com