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Arrested Development: Voters Choose Delay

Syosset-Jericho will get new development—just not any time soon

The people of Oyster Bay have spoken, or at least 12 percent of them have, and by a margin of more than two to one they elected to sell 54 acres of Town-owned property in Syosset-Jericho for $32.5 million.

They voted to sell to a consortium of developers led by Simon Property Group, without open bidding that might fetch a higher price. In doing so, they shut out rival developer Taubman Centers Inc., which owns the neighboring 39-acre site and has been lobbying (and suing) for nearly 20 years for permission to build a megamall there.

They voted after weeks of intense—sometimes nasty—campaigning that included aggressive community outreach, blizzard-force marketing and attorneys taking depositions. The two sides traded accusations of deceit, misinformation, and venality, some more grounded in fact than others.  

But the big picture changes little with this vote, which mainly sets the parties up for continued delay. Assuming the sale goes through according to voters’ wishes, the town will occupy the site free of charge for five more years, and maybe pay rent to stay another three after that. So the new owners, who have indicated plans for a residential/retail mixed-use facility, won’t be developing anything anytime soon.

The bitter accusations continue without pause. After the vote, Town Supervisor John Venditto (on the ‘Vote Yes’ side) released a statement celebrating the rejection of “Taubman’s greed and shameful and unethical behavior.” Kyle Sklerov, spokesman for LI Jobs Now (on the ‘Vote No’ side), responded that the town’s “misinformation campaign” let it “slip [a] rotten deal past the public.” Predictably, the losers are preparing to fight the result of the vote in court.

“Once a mall developer identifies an area of interest, he/she will not quit,” concluded John Mullins and Zenia Kotval, professors of regional planning and co-authors of several papers on mall development dating back to the early 1990s. “Even if it takes years, once a market is identified every effort will be made to ensure that the development opportunity is not lost.” As its first outpost in New York, the Gold Coast location likely holds special importance for the global developer, which has spent upwards of $150 million to date.

From the beginning, the anti-mall faction said a ‘yes’ vote would “stop the mall.” Toward the end, the other side was saying a ‘no’ vote would stop the mall. Neither claim was accurate.

The mall in question is one Taubman has been, since 1995, lobbying and suing to build on its 39-acre parcel. Some local residents support the mall plan, for the construction and retail jobs it will bring. On Christmas a few years back, trade union members gave out lumps of coal to chide lawmakers for blocking progress. Similarly, there are local business leaders who hate to see this capacious expanse of prime real estate by the highway going to waste. One called it a “regional disgrace.”

The grassroots support for the mall, however, is less passionately engaged than its opposition, which has successfully stymied the project. The town board has refused to issue the zoning exemptions and special permits through at least three iterations, sending the developer back for more impact assessments. Taubman has shrunk its plan from a million square feet to around 800,000 square feet, and offered other accommodations and mitigations.

Yet the anti-mall forces, now empowered by the vote, show no signs of relenting. “We, as residents, stand together in what we know is best for our community,” said longtime county legislator Judy Jacobs after the vote. “I have never wavered in 25 years from my original stand that a mall in this area is not warranted and would have had a disastrous impact. Hard work is easy work when you are striving for what you believe in.”

Taubman allegedly offered more money, or at least was willing to, if the purchase came with the right special permits for the mall project. Furthermore, additional space would provide more leeway to mitigate possible negative impacts. The company could, for example, use the significant additional space to keep mall traffic off local streets or shield residents from noise and pollution, overcoming some of the town’s objections to the project. Selling to a Taubman rival nixes those possibilities.

But it doesn’t change the essential fact that Taubman owns a large piece of land, nor the company’s desire to build a mall there. In fact, if the Simon group puts up a mixed-use development, that might make the site more attractive, providing a built-in group of potential customers nearby.

“The referendum was never about a mall, which can still be built on Taubman’s property,” said Kyle Sklerov, spokesman for the Taubman side on LI. “We will continue to push this case in the courts and are committed to making sure the Town acts in the best interests of its taxpayers rather than Simon Property Group – whose only interest is maintaining its mall monopoly.”

At best, the referendum vote will bring a new development to Oyster Bay. Maybe it will be an office park or medical facility or computer company. Maybe there will be retail stores on the ground floor and apartments up top. With no concrete plan, anything’s possible.

But it’s not going to happen any time soon.

And it’s not going to stop Taubman from pursuing its dream of a Gold Coast megamall.

News

Vastra boutique finds a niche

in hand-embroidered dresses

Who says a bride has to wear white on her wedding day? For South Asian brides, no color is off limits including brilliant reds, blues and golds. For the past 17 years, Vastra in Hicksville has been helping brides from New York and across the country find the perfect dress for their special day.

There’s no lack of Indian sari boutiques in Hicksville but according to Marketing Director Prachi Jain, what sets Vastra apart from the others is its emphasis on one of a kind, hand-embroidered Indian dresses.

Many would consider it rude to play with your food. That is unless, you’re participating in the Long Island Potato Festival. The event, which was held in Cutchogue, NY, included a mashed potato sculpting contest which was dominated by Hicksville’s Sarah Tsang, who won first place in the youth division.

Contestants were allowed to use any tools and materials to help bring their creation to life. Sculptures were left on display throughout the day and voted on by festival goers.


Sports

Somehow LSA, the Levittown Swimming Association, has always been a part of our Hicksville summers. My family’s introduction to the organization in 1975 began when our two older daughters tried out for the Parkway Swim Team, one of the nine teams that competed through July and most of August.

It was no small task for the younger girl, swimming her first full lap in the deep end of the pool to qualify at age six, but both girls made the team and donned the coveted gray tee shirts as the trees cast their shadows over the pool water at the end of practice.

I’m convinced that the soul and the center of Hicksville is Cantiague Park. And why not? Every weekend it’s a beehive of activity ranging from tennis matches, hand ball games, basketball and baseball games, swimming, hockey and of course ‘the beautiful game’ called soccer. Cantiague has two professional soccer fields that are perfectly manicured and begging to be played on. And they were. This weekend was the finals of the East Meadow Soccer Tournament which is one of the largest youth soccer tournaments in the nation, sponsored by the US Soccer Federation. There were 18 boys and girls teams in the finals and a large staff of referees.

Two of the refs were Steven Orozco and Randy Vogt who told me how soccer had been growing and has now become the second most popular participation sport in America with 25 million of us watching this year’s World Cup.  I also met and interviewed Joe Codispoti who along with Tim Bradbury is the head coach of Rockville Centre United, a U16 boys club.  This U16 team has a group of standout players led by  Jack Graziano, AJ Codispoti and Pat Basile who have been playing together for six years.


Calendar

Close Encounters with Benevolent ETs and Ascended Masters

August 29

Adventures in Genealogy

September 4

Greek Festival

September 5-7



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com