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Where West Meets East

Health benefits in more ways than one

West East All Natural Bistro and Wine Bar is a fresh and virginal startup that provides hope for change in a landscape that has become stagnant and saturated with the same, tired, fast food, assembly-line approach, and artificially hospitable corporate eateries.

A few years ago Raquel Jadeja and her husband, Jay were just regular customers of Danny Wu’s establishment. Wu is the original owner of The West East All Natural Bistro. The Jadejas many years of restaurant experience led them to become Wu’s unofficial consultants. Their friendship, which was a symbiotic progression, culminated when Jay became a co-owner and head chef in October of 2012.

Raquel who is a certified health coach explained, “When we started out, we wanted to bring something that was in line with our beliefs; we wanted to bring the organic lifestyle.”

 If your healthy conscience still desires more reassurance, the words of Jay Jadeja should bring calm to any faltering nerves. Jay would never serve you food that he wouldn’t serve to his own children. “The food I cook and serve is a reflection of who I am,” said Jay.

The newly formed partnership between Wu and the Jadejas has been a fast growing evolution. In January they began serving hormone-free, grass-fed meats, which are clinically proven to provide much-needed omega 3 fats, that unfortunately, so many Americans lack because of mainstream diets.  

Terri, a local patron from Bethpage, whose new found appreciation for a healthy living told the Hicksville Illustrated News that is exactly what has kept her coming back for the last couple of years. “The food is delicious; it’s fresh and healthy, and you feel really good after you eat it.”

Raquel said the restaurant has received a very positive response. Their affirmation for healthy food has brought in customers from as far as Long Beach, and even gained the recognition of an organization called Slow Food.

Slow Food, as described on their website at slowfoodusa.org, started out as an idea to promote a healthy way of living and eating. They have thousands of members in over 150 countries that are committed to the important connection between food, community, and the environment. West East Bistro also recently won Slow Food’s much-coveted “Snail of Approval” honor.

West East Bistro’s passion for sustenance and growth does not just encompass the ecosystem of the edible variety; they are just as committed to the societal ecosystem we all live in. This can be shown through their generous decision in April to donate 20 percent of their proceeds every Wednesday throughout the summer to the “Nassau Hurricane Relief Fund”.

The fund has been helping the victims of Hurricane Sandy. Raquel Jadeja partnered with Nassau County and believes that the idea is “fully in line with her ideas on giving back to the community.”

West East Bistro is a healthy and friendly place to eat. Twice a month they hold food and wine tastings for the community to come and enjoy. Whether you enjoy spicy South Asian food or you seek the adventure of eating wild game, these bimonthly events are always themed differently.

“The generosity of West East Bistro is appreciated by all those working to make the victims of Hurricane Sandy whole again. It is another example of the outpouring of support that the communities have received from their neighbors,” said County Executive Edward Mangano. “Through the kindness of this local business we will continue to be able to provide some measure of assistance to those still making their way back.”

So stop by 758 South Broadway in Hicksville, where having a meal here not only illuminates the health, but also helps the victims of Hurricane Sandy. Where you can make new friends over wine and enjoy the special theme being held that night. When you eat here, you’re making the healthy choice in more ways than one. Visit www.westeastbistro.com or call 516-939-6618 for more information.

News

A group of like-minded local residents banded together and saved more than 200 area trees from the chopping block — for now.

A state judge ordered Nassau County and the Department of Public Works to stop cutting down trees along South Oyster Bay Road, granting a temporary restraining order to a group of residents spearheading an effort to save the trees.

State Supreme Court Judge Antonio Brandveen scheduled a hearing on Thursday, Oct. 16 for the county to address complaints from residents, in particular a group called Operation STOMP (Save Trees Over More Pavement) founded by Hicksville native Tanya Lukasik.The Public Works department had planned to removed more than 200 30-foot trees in communities ranging from Plainview, Bethpage, Hicksville and Syosset.

For the past 16 years, Lucia Simon has walked from her home in Hicksville to her job at the Hicksville Public Library. She enjoys her job as a librarian and says that the staff has become like family to her. But for the past three years, Simon and 56 fellow co-workers have been frustrated at what she says is the library’s board refusal to negotiate a fair contract.  

“We have had no contract in three years. They refuse to bargain with us. Every time they come back to us it’s not fair,” says Simon.

However, the board of trustees disagree, saying that it has made a “fair offer.”


Sports

The Girls Varsity soccer team, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, wore pink uniforms and pink socks in their game on Oct. 8 against MacArthur whom they defeated 1-0. The girls and boys soccer programs at Hicksville High School are selling pink ribbon car magnets with a soccer ball and HHS on it with the words “Kick Cancer” on the ribbon. All the money raised will go to the Sarah Grace Foundation, which is a local foundation trying to beat pediatric cancer. The players plan to raise $1,000 for this organization

— From Hicksville High School

Hicksville native progressing through Mets system

The Mets minor league system is enjoying a rare period of prosperity. For years, it was barren due to trading off high-ceiling players for major leaguers, or neglecting the draft in favor of the free agent market. Since General Manager Sandy Alderson took over, the organization has reversed course and put a much greater emphasis on player development. During his second-to-last season, however, former GM Omar Minaya took a chance and drafted a local catcher, Cam Maron, out of Hicksville High School in the 34th round.


Calendar

Spooktacular Halloween

October 17

Fall Festival

October 18

Veterans Casework Seminar

October 21



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com