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Taking The Baton: Relay For Life

Residents raise money for cancer research

On Saturday, June 8, over 200 Hicksville residents, along with their family and friends, will participate in Relay for Life to honor those who have died from cancer, celebrate those who have overcome it and support those who are fighting against it. Relay for Life is hosted by the American Cancer Society in an effort to raise awareness about the disease.

Megan Stewart, manager of special events for the American Cancer Society said, “Relay is an opportunity to celebrate life and fight back against cancer. It is a way to do something good and help those whom we love.”

During this 12-hour walk-a-thon, teams will camp out at Cantiague Park on West John Street and take turns walking or running around a predetermined path. Relay for Life is a fundraising event and teams are encouraged to find donations from friends and family, as well as get businesses to sponsor them if they choose. The event also honors caregivers, as their commitment and love outweigh all of the struggles that come with the disease. Since its inception in 1985, Relay has become the world’s largest movement to end cancer.

This year, survivors and their families are invited to a pre-Relay dinner at Knights of Columbus for the traditional Survivors Dinner at 6 p.m. Hicksville Legislator Rose Walker is the special Survivor Speaker this year, kicking off Relay for Life at 7 p.m. by sharing her story and encouraging others to keep moving forward in their efforts to end cancer. An inspirational Survivor’s Lap soon follows where all those who have beat the disease take one lap together, symbolizing their strength and how far they have come. “Survivors are living proof that we can beat this and we attend Relay to show them our support,” said Stewart.

As the event proceeds, games and music fill the park, as well as other sources of entertainment, but participants never lose sight of their primary objective. “We have set a goal of $60,000 this year and since starting in Hicksville in 2010, we have raised over $150,000,” stated Stewart. “Hicksville has done an incredible job in the past few years, but we still have more to do. It is important to participate in Relay to show those living with cancer that we believe in them and are fighting for them.”

Come nightfall, the emotional Luminaria Ceremony begins, honoring those whose lives were lost. Candles are placed inside white paper bags filled with sand — each in special memory of one person — and the bags are lined up, illuminating the pathway. “Each bag represents a life,” explained Stewart. “They glow throughout the night and we take a few laps in silence to remember those we lost. It reminds us that in honor of these people, we must finish the fight. Along with the Survivors Lap, it is one of the most incredible experiences of Relay.”

Relay concludes at sunrise with an announcement of the event’s earnings and the Fight Back Ceremony. Everyone makes a personal commitment to save lives by fighting back against this debilitating condition. By taking action, such as receiving a screening test, quitting smoking or talking to someone about the issue, the world is that much closer to ending the fight.

“We participate in Relay so that one day, no one has to hear the words, ‘You have cancer’,” said Stewart. Thanks to this life-changing event, the American Cancer Society continues to save lives.

For more information about Hicksville’s 4th annual Relay for Life, the public is invited to attend a meeting on April 30 from 7:30 to 8 p.m. at The Computer Resource Center on Jerusalem Avenue. Contact Megan Stewart for additional details and information at 631-300-3150, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , or visit www.relayforlife.org/hicksvilleny to sign-up or donate.

News

The parking lot of Sears in Hicksville transformed into a sea of cars this past Saturday as part of the ninth annual Long Island Cruizin’ For A Cure Car Show. 

 

The show, which was founded by Jericho prostate cancer survivor Sandy Kane, is the only car show on Long Island dedicated to raising funds for research, testing and also education for early detection of prostate cancer. The all-volunteer car show usually draws around 4,000 attendees. It features 600 cars, trucks, motorcycles and more; a perfect day for car enthusiasts and the like.

A forecast for steady rain did not deter hundreds of children, students, faculty members and community residents from attending Hicksville’s Homecoming on Sept. 13 at Hicksville High School.

 

The day was full of festivities for everyone, including the High School’s traditional family fair, which was held across the backfield before the hometown Comets’ game against the

Levittown Macarthur Generals. The fair featured a variety of foods, games, a bouncy house and booths for various school clubs and many other attractions. Faculty members reconnected with their students — both past and present — and there were countless community members and alumni proudly wearing combinations of Hicksville’s orange and black.


Sports

This November, Hicksville resident Marlo Signoracci will head to Florida for Ironman, a demanding, long-distance triathlon that includes biking, running and swimming. Here, she shares her story as she prepares for one of the most physically challenging athletic events out there.

 

If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you! 

At 6 a.m. on a blustery Saturday morning 1,600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay triathlon and tri- relay race. The participants were from all over Long Island, some from upstate NY, a few from out of state and were all ages and some even with disabilities but all came with one goal in mind, to finish.

The course starts out as a half mile swim in Oyster Bay Harbor, then a 9.3 mile bike ride through Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, and Cove neck which is very hilly but finishes with a 2.9 mile downhill to the finish. Then the riders have one more leg of the race which is 3.2 mile run through Mill Neck and Brookville, up to Planting Fields Arboretum and back down to Roosevelt Park to the finish line.


Calendar

Board of Ed Meeting - September 17

Back To School Night - September 18

Pasta Dinner Fundraiser - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com