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Weitzman: Downtowns Are Key

Former Comptroller wants hometown feel in

Nassau County, IDA cooperation

“The comptroller is there to protect the taxpayers.”

That is what former Nassau Comptroller Howard Weitzman says is the job of a comptroller. It’s something he says he did during his eight years in the position, and it’s something that he wants to do again. Weitzman was elected to the position in 2001 and 2005 before being narrowly defeated by current Nassau County George Maragos in 2009.

Weitzman blames his defeat on a rare illness he contracted in 2009, which he says prevented him from running a full campaign. He says that despite his limited campaigning he was still only defeated by a narrow margin – 800 votes.

Now that he’s feeling better, and he says his doctors have encouraged him to seek office, he is trying to reclaim the position. However, before he gets a chance to have a rematch with Maragos, he first has to win his party’s nomination. Democratic Nassau County Legislator Wayne Wink has recently announced that he is also running for comptroller.

Weitzman is a CPA and served as mayor of Great Neck Estates. He lived in Massapequa for six years and his first two children were born in the old New Island Hospital in Bethpage. He expects strong support from Massapequa and Farmingdale,

“They will know that the taxpayer has a voice looking out for them,” Weitzman said when asked why residents of southeast Nassau would vote for him.

The former comptroller and current candidate also praised the current downtown revitalization project underway in Farmingdale. He said that although Nassau County was one of the first suburban counties in the country, America is changing and changes needs to come with it. He thinks building up downtown areas near railroad stations, which is being done in Farmingdale, is what is needed to revitalize the county.

“We have to offer alternatives, and you build them around railroad stations,” he said. “I give them a lot if credit.” He also added that there should be multiple family dwellings and beautiful single-family homes near stations to accomplish this, and he hopes this vision will be brought to other locations in Nassau as well. In fact, he even said that although he has an issue with Nassau County Executive Executive Edward P. Mangano’s administration on bonding, he would be okay with borrowing if it used to build up downtown areas.

“You rarely see a comptroller say that construction borrowing is bad borrowing,” he commented.

Weitzman also said that he role of the comptroller is to review contracts and accounts payable accounts, conduct audits, and oversee payroll and benefits, He says he did that efficiently when he had the job, saying that the county’s finances were in shambles when he took office in 2001 and by auditing the police, the jails and Social Security, savings of at least $10 million were found. He also remarked that he found waste, fraud and abuse in special districts and that the county saved $5 to $6 million per year eliminating duplicating health coverage for married Nassau employees.

Weitzman also criticized Maragos and current Mangano. He blasted Mangano’s handling of county finances, saying that there has been two bond downgrades and there is no financial plan. He also took issue with the wage freeze imposed by Mangano, which was overturned in court as well as the decision to pass tax certiorari refunds onto school districts, which was also overturned in court. Weitzman said that Maragos had a responsibility to hold Mangano accountable for these policies as well as Mangano’s reliance on bonding to pass budgets, but failed to do so.

“The comptroller’s office has reverted back to the past and Maragos is a puppet for the administration,” Weitzman charged.

Weitzman said if given his old job back he would work towards making Nassau County more competitive with other suburban counties. He said that Westchester doesn’t have the beaches, universities and hospitals that Nassau has, and that young professionals would be attracted to living here if the county’s finances are in order and young people could afford to live here. He added that he stands by his performance and says that will motivate voters to give him the nod against both Wink and Maragos. “They can see what my record was,” he said. “The most important thing is not what they say but what they do,” he said of elected officials.

News

A forecast for steady rain did not deter hundreds of children, students, faculty members and community residents from attending Hicksville’s Homecoming on Sept. 13 at Hicksville High School.

 

The day was full of festivities for everyone, including the High School’s traditional family fair, which was held across the backfield before the hometown Comets’ game against the

Levittown Macarthur Generals. The fair featured a variety of foods, games, a bouncy house and booths for various school clubs and many other attractions. Faculty members reconnected with their students — both past and present — and there were countless community members and alumni proudly wearing combinations of Hicksville’s orange and black.

Dutch Lane Elementary School teacher Jaimie Fleschner went from the classroom to the pitcher’s mound recently, winning KJOY’s “Best Teacher On Long Island” contest.  

 

Fleschner still doesn’t know who nominated her for the contest and only found out she had been entered after she got a phone call from the radio station. 

 

“They told me I was nominated and I was completely shocked and flattered. It was a great feeling,” says Fleschner. 


Sports

This November, Hicksville resident Marlo Signoracci will head to Florida for Ironman, a demanding, long-distance triathlon that includes biking, running and swimming. Here, she shares her story as she prepares for one of the most physically challenging athletic events out there.

 

If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you! 

At 6 a.m. on a blustery Saturday morning 1,600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay triathlon and tri- relay race. The participants were from all over Long Island, some from upstate NY, a few from out of state and were all ages and some even with disabilities but all came with one goal in mind, to finish.

The course starts out as a half mile swim in Oyster Bay Harbor, then a 9.3 mile bike ride through Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, and Cove neck which is very hilly but finishes with a 2.9 mile downhill to the finish. Then the riders have one more leg of the race which is 3.2 mile run through Mill Neck and Brookville, up to Planting Fields Arboretum and back down to Roosevelt Park to the finish line.


Calendar

Board of Ed Meeting - September 17

Back To School Night - September 18

Pasta Dinner Fundraiser - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com