Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.

Health Concerns Focus At Superfund Site Meeting

The second meeting of the Powers Chemco property site at Glen Cove City Hall last Thursday night focused on health concerns in the surrounding area. Spokesmen from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), Department of Health (DOH) and other environmental experts discussed the extent of the contaminated soil and water at the site. It was a continued discussion on the proposed clean-up of the State Superfund site, which was formerly occupied by the Columbia Ribbon and Carbon

Manufacturing Company, and now located within the 15-acre Konica Minolta property.

 

“After careful studies, we found that the contaminated soil and water table poses no threat to nearby residences,” said Nathan Epler, a hydrogeologist from the environmental consulting and management firm Roux Associates. 

 

Epler said that in 2007-2008 a soil vapor intrusion investigation was conducted at residences adjacent to the site so see if any contamination was impacting people’s homes. The study found that there was low level contamination in the soil vapor but, “not at levels where action was needed.” 

 

In 2011-2012, a follow up investigation was conducted to further delineate the levels of contamination within the soil.

 

Joe DeFranco, director of environmental protection of the Nassau County Department of Health, said that his department has done analysis of the site to make sure the community will be protected during all of the remediation.

 

He listed the inhalation of contaminated air as the primary exposure route during the excavation process. 

 

“We are putting a Community Air Monitoring Plan (CAMP) in place, which provides specific procedures for measuring, documenting, and responding to potential airborne contaminants during the remedial action,” said DeFranco.

 

He listed other possible routes of exposure as contaminated drinking water or derma contact from touching contaminated soil.

 

“As far as the drinking water is concerned, it has already been stated that public supply wells are not contaminated and the NCDOH monitors these wells on a regular basis. As for the public getting contaminated soil on their skin, there is no chance of that happening as that situation doesn’t exist here.” 

 

One resident at the meeting was concerned about the safety of neighborhood children, saying that there were two elementary schools and a playground within a half mile of the contaminated property.

 

“The state is continuously monitoring the air, particulate and soil at the site,” said Epler. “We are making sure that nothing migrates off of that site.”

 

Another question concerned the purity of the clean fill that will replace the contaminated soil at the site.

 

“The clean fill or fill dirt is being transported in from private gravel quarries and sand pits. The fill is tested to make sure that it is 100 percent clean.”

 

Work is scheduled to begin in March on the property.

 

Project documents are available for review at the Glen Cove Public Library; additional site details, including environmental and health assessment summaries, are available on NYSDEC’s website at:  www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/detexternal/haz/details.cfm?pageid=3&progno=130028. 


News

It was the second annual goal setting workshop at Glen Cove High School on Tuesday, Oct. 14 and both the board of education and the public came up with some sound ideas for the district. School Superintendent Maria Rianna presented a slide show of four main areas that are the focus of district goals.

 

“We began this process last year and these goals are representative of what the community wanted to see,” said Rianna.

Glen Cove residents may see a 1.64 percent increase in the tax levy next year, the amount proposed at last week’s public hearing. Mayor Reginald Spinello and the Glen Cove City Council held an initial reading of the proposed budget for 2015, and will take final vote on Tuesday, Oct. 28, at the next city council meeting.

 

“It’s very easy for a first time mayor to raise the taxes and blame it on a prior administration, and that is not what I am doing,” said Mayor Spinello. “In the past three administrations there were budgets with increases of  almost 28 percent to down to 12 percent, but it’s a different time now...I think that the residents are certainly going to feel relief. I put together a budget...that I believe is fair and reasonable and a good budget.”


Sports

The Town of Oyster Bay, in conjunction with the New York Rangers, will once again host a special Try Hockey for Free Program on Sunday morning, Oct. 26 from 8 a.m. to noon at ithe Ice Skating Center located in Bethpage Community Park, 1000 Stewart Ave. 

 

The event will allow youngsters a unique opportunity to sample the sport of ice hockey. Four morning sessions will be available. Session times are 8 to 9 a.m., 9 to 10 a.m., 10 to 11 a.m. and 11 a.m. to noon.

On Thursday, Oct. 2, North Shore High School quarterback Michael Floccari shattered a school record and tied a Long Island record for the most touchdown passes in a game. This accomplishment ties him with E.J. Clark from Seaford High School (1977) and Joe Capobianco form Lawrence High school (2011). 


Calendar

Harvest Square Dance - October 24

Fall Festival - Octobner 24 - 25

Peace, Politics and Projectiles - October 26


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com