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A Native Thanksgiving

Visitors to Nassau County’s Garvies Point Museum and Preserve were transported back in time on Nov. 23 and 24 when the museum held its Annual Thanksgiving Native American Feast. More than 1,000 people attended the two-day event, which showcased the lives of Native Americans. Numerous hands-on activities gave participants the opportunity to try their luck at spear throwing, corn grinding, cooking over an open fire and pottery making. 

 

The feast was the perfect outing for several Cub Scout troops and group home organizations as well as for families from across Long Island. For Sea Cliff siblings Zeke and Uma it was a special day at a place they visit often and have strong ties to. Their grandfather had been one of the museum’s early volunteers. For the Ferrera family of Islip it was a new adventure. Renee Ferrera is a social studies teacher who had taken her classes on trips to Garvies in the past and always enjoyed it. 

 

 “When I saw they were having this event, I just knew it would be a perfect time to bring my husband and my own kids here,” said Ferrera.  

 

One of the most popular attractions of the weekend was the outdoor fire pit. Volunteer Ted Strickroth (Tipi Ted) of the Wilderness Travel Museum engaged the crowd by demonstrating how to make a fire by, literally, rubbing two sticks together.

 

“The fire was the TV of long ago,” said Strickroth. “Children would sit in the wigwams, watch the fire and listen to the stories of the elders.”  

 

Children and adults alike had the chance to prepare and cook native foods over the fire, including popcorn soup, fish and squash.  Once the food was cooked, Strickroth explained that in the days of the Native Americans, the young ones

made an offering of food to the elders and, in turn, the elders offered wisdom to the young. The children were then asked to come up to the fire where they were given food that they then offered to an elder in the crowd. The fish and the squash were declared “delicious;” the popcorn soup not so much.   

 

Brian Nugent, the recently appointed Chief Deputy Commissioner of Parks, Recreation and Museums for Nassau County,  dropped by on Saturday to survey the festivities.  

 

“This is fantastic,” said Nugent. “It shows the true meaning of Thanksgiving in the past and I hope this weekend is the beginning of a great Thanksgiving week for all the families who came here.”

 

Garvies Museum has been celebrating its Annual Thanksgiving Native American Feast on the weekend before Thanksgiving for more than 30 years explained Kathryne Natale, former museum worker and current President of the Friends of Garvies, who first conceived of the idea.  Close to 40 volunteers work hard each year to make it a very special event. 

News

The Mayor’s Annual Snapper Derby had plenty of kids, fish and fun on the Pryibil Beach Pier in Glen Cove this past Saturday. On the pier were lots of parents and children fishing for prizes. Below the pier the snappers in the water were only too happy to cooperate with the children trying to catch them. For a while it looked like the children were “catching” and not fishing.

The Glen Cove City Council’s decision to allow amplified music at outdoor cafes at last week’s special meeting was music to the ears of The View Grill manager Frank Venturino. The council voted 6-1 in favor of the decision to allow music from the period of Aug. 12 to Sept. 30. Councilman Efraim Spagnoletti was the only council member to vote no on the resolution.

 

“We just want to have some background entertainment for our patrons while they are at our restaurant,” said Venturino. “We don’t plan to get wild with the music. We just want to support local talent who entertain people with a microphone and maybe an acoustic guitar from 3 to 7 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.”


Sports

All athletes interested in putting their bodies to the ultimate test can hop on over to Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park in Oyster Bay, which will once again be the site of Long Island’s premiere multisport event – the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon on Saturday, Aug. 23, and the Runner’s Edge – Town of Oyster Bay Junior Triathlon for youngsters ages 8-13 on Sunday, Aug. 24. 

 

The Saturday main event is a “sprint” triathlon, which consists of a half-mile swim in Oyster Bay harbor, a one loop 15 kilometer bike ride over hill and dale through beautiful Oyster Bay, Oyster Bay Cove and Laurel Hollow, and a 5 kilometer run through Mill Neck and Brookville, “up” to Planting Fields Arboretum and “down”to the finish at back at  Roosevelt  Park.

Kristen Gillman earned a come-from-behind two-up victory over Brooke Mackenzie Henderson in the 36-hole championship match of the 2014 U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship, being conducted at the 6,297-yard, par-70 Nassau Country Club in Glen Cove. The final match was held on Sunday, Aug. 10.

 

Gillman, 16, of Austin, Texas, was three down through 26 holes to Henderson, 16, of Canada. But Gillman, a junior at Lake Travis High School, birdied five of the final 10 holes to complete the remarkable rally.


Calendar

Zumba-Thon Fundraiser

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Live Music

Wednesday, Aug. 27

School Supply Program

Saturday, Aug. 30



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com