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Health And Wellness Curriculum Discussed By NS Board Of Ed

New federal school lunch program portions scrutinized

The North Shore School District Board of Education meeting, held on Thursday, Sept. 20, centered around two discussions: the health and wellness curriculum, which is currently slated for changes and possible expansion, and the status on the extra-curricular activity clubs that are active for this school year.

Assistant Superintendent for Instruction Rob Chlebicki and Don Lang, director of the physical education department, presented their findings on how the district’s curriculum fits in with national and state standards and said they created a “North Shore standard” that incorporates what they feel are the most comprehensive and relevant areas for education, keeping in line with the questions that the board of education had previously given to them. Chlebicki said the next step is to get all of the health teachers – most of whom are coaches with busy schedules– to set a time to begin writing and refining the curriculum.

Lang mentioned that some of the tools currently being utilized in the health classes, such as role-playing scenarios, have had a positive impact on students’ decision-making processes. However, he said that currently, health education stops after one semester in ninth grade, which may not give them enough tools to make healthy decisions later in their teen years. He said they are working on addressing the expansion of the health curriculum into the high school, perhaps by tapping into community resources and bringing in guest speakers. He noted that some other positive changes have been noticed as a result of the current courses, including helping students identify and deal with stress, knowing who to talk to when students need support, and making healthier meal choices, which he attributed to the changes in the cafeteria offerings.

Chlebicki said two areas that teachers in the district do not currently address are response to failure (how to deal with failure) and abortion; he said that both topics need to be looked at and potentially included in the curriculum to give students a broader knowledge base.

Trustee Tom Knierim brought up the issue of technology as related to health, and Chlebicki said that the classes do address technology on a lot of different levels, from the safety aspect to new applications for detection of certain health problems.

Board President Carolyn Genovesi noted that a lot of the technology issues are personal family values, and that parent education is also important, as students’ knowledge of technology may surpass a parent’s in some cases.

During the discussion, the new federal guidelines set in place for the school lunch program was brought up. Assistant Superintendent for Business Olivia Buatsi said that the guidelines are very “rigid” in terms of how much protein and calories students can receive, and they must keep track of everything. Furthermore, they are not allowed to differentiate between students receiving a free or reduced lunch and those paying.

“The district gets reimbursed for every meal served, but we must meet all of the components,” Buatsi said. “All of it must be documented.”

She said those who can afford to eat more can purchase their food a la carte; currently, she said the plan is to discuss the issue with the parent associations, and the board members requested further details on a breakdown of the guidelines as well as a report on the discussions with parents to determine if a new direction needs to be considered.

“Middle school and high school boys who are active in sports are not getting enough protein,” said one parent in the audience. “Many kids are going off campus for food.”

The board also discussed the status of clubs, after having requested a report last year on how much teachers get paid for leading the clubs, how many students are enrolled and what proof is required of teachers showing that the clubs have met and remain active.

Trustee George Pombar took issue with the minimum number of students required per club, currently set at five. He said he felt it was too small and not worth the cost to the district; after much discussion, the board agreed to raise the minimum number to eight, but to leave an exception that principals can make a case to keep a club active for smaller numbers if they felt it appropriate.

“We need to look at the greater good of the club, not just the number,” said Knierim. “I think it’s good to have a place for every kid.”

News

This year marks the 35th anniversary of The Sea Cliff Village Museum. Founded in 1979, the museum serves as a place to preserve and publicly display historical items of  past Sea Cliff residents. The museum displays both temporary and permanent collections from the 18th through 20th centuries. Most of the items and artifacts in the museum have been donated by residents of Sea Cliff who want to share them with the rest of the North Shore community. 

Glen Cove Cinemas is on track to open on Thursday, April 10, according to its owners and management team.

“No more delays - Thursday is the day,” says theater operator Jay Levinson. 

 

 Last week the newly renovated Glen Cove Cinemas was expected to open, though the grand opening had to be postponed due to various complications. As of Saturday, most of the six screens in the theater were ready for customers, with new seats and carpet and fresh paint on the walls, all of the bathrooms were working and spotless, and the new digital projectors were in place. 


Sports

The Glen Cove Junior Lacrosse Club kicked off their 20th season with the third- and fourth-grade boys winning their home opener against Deer Park on a moist and muddy Sunday morning.  

Despite the weather forecast, the boys were determined to play after spending the last three months practicing indoors. It was a hard fought battle with the lead changing several times, but at the end Glen Cove managed to hold on for a 6 – 5 victory.  

Anchoring the victory was goalie Tyler Shea, who stopped several point blank one-on-ones and recorded 13 saves in the game. The offense started slow, but began clicking as the game went on. Providing the firepower was Ryan Houghton with two goals and Micah Stone, Eamon Doyle, Andrew Epifania and Lukasz Dubicki, each adding one.  Epifania and Andrew Bisch each had an assist in the winning effort.

Glen Cove High School hosted the PTSA-sponsored Red vs. Green Games last month, an evening of traditional and non-traditional sporting activities in which students and adults represented their schools of past and present allegiance by donning either red- or green-colored attire. Students of all ages came to their schools the day of the event wearing either red or green. Gribbin and Connolly elementary schools are traditional green schools while Deasy and Landing are red schools. 


Calendar

Kiddie Egg Hunt - April 11

Offbeat Artifacts Sale - April 12 

Glen Cove Eggstravaganza - April 16


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