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Rival Garbage Haulers Compete For East Williston Contract

Trash talk dominated the discussion in East Williston last week as the village held a public hearing to determine whether to dump their current and somewhat embattled garbage hauler, Dejana, in favor of the next lowest bidding company, Meadow Carting. 

Port Washington-based Dejana Industries, Inc., has been the village’s garbage hauling company since 2009, under a competitively bid contract which provides options to renew at the village’s discretion. The company’s current contract expires on May 31st. 

Mayor David Tanner had said in January that the board had decided to take the option with Dejana to rebid the garbage carting contract. 

At last week’s meeting, representatives from both Dejana and Westbury-based Meadow Carting spoke before the board.

 “The purpose of the hearing is to gather all the relevant information from both companies and make an informed decision,” Mayor Tanner said. 

No matter which company the village ultimately decides on, Mayor Tanner said, there will be a “nice” cost savings. 

Dejana was the lowest bidder at $312,752, nearly $10,000 less than their previous contract, and Meadow Carting was next lowest at $326,400.  

The impetus to rebid the village’s current trash hauling contract with Dejana  came amid complaints from both village residents and board members that the company’s level of service had been slipping in recent months.

Last May, the village had approved a three-year contract with Dejana, despite past resident gripes about the company’s overall service. Many of the resident complaints, according to Mayor Tanner, charged that Dejana was not actually recycling and was simply mixing “solid waste and recyclables” together. 

Attorney Anthony Corte, a representative for Meadow Carting, spoke briefly and told the board that “recycling would be a top priority,” for Meadow. 

Corte also explained that Meadow, like Dejana, utilizes trucks with side-by-side compartments for solid waste in one compartment and recyclables in the other. 

John Mangano, director of business development for Dejana, said that this very fact could explain the complaints from some East Williston residents that the company was mixing regular garbage with recyclables. 

 “Sometimes, people might see workers throwing trash and the recyclables into the compartments and not realize that everything is being separated out,” Mangano explained. “We take recycling very seriously and we don’t ever mix anything together.” 

Moreover, Mangano said, of the 22 complaints compiled by the village’s clerk, not one was for recycling. Tanner said at the hearing that many resident complaints were “recycling related.” 

Mangano noted that out of the complaints, seven were made by members of the board or members of board committees; two were from a resident who owns an abandoned house that the Village has won the right in court to demolish and two were anonymous. 

“I personally spoke to several complainants,” Mangano said in an email following the meeting. “Those I talked with said their complaints had been resolved to their satisfaction. In my opinion, the complaints were blown out of proportion. Twenty-two complaints out of a total Village population of 2,556 represents less than one tenth of a percent.”

However, a letter of complaint from a 20-year village resident, read aloud at the hearing, criticized Dejana’s overall service calling it “incompetent and unprofessional with poor customer service.” 

The resident implored village officials to look past the company’s “low bid” and to think carefully before awarding a new contract. 

But, not everyone was dissatisfied with Dejana. One resident of Downing Street reported that he’s “generally happy with the people picking up his garbage,” noting that there will always be people who have a problem with most things. 

Mayor Tanner said he hopes to have a decision on the garbage contract by April 1. 

 

In other news:

Garage Sale Day? 

Mayor Tanner said the village is mulling setting aside one day per year for village-wide garage sales. 

 

Complaints Department

A resident complained of cars going through a Do Not Enter sign on Post Lane. “It’s just dangerous,” she said. 

Another resident complained of people keeping their Christmas lights up all year long. “I think it contributes to a downward spiral of the village,” she said. “I think it’s certain people who just don’t want to go up on a ladder and take their lights down.”

 

Let’s see those numbers

A village resident asked that all financials related to the village be posted on the East Williston website. “It’s all public information, right?” he asked.  


News

Longtime village administrator to

receive President’s Award

The Garden City Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the presentation of its President’s Award to Robert (Bob) L. Schoelle, Jr., a Garden City resident for 43 years, at the 2014 Pineapple Ball at the Garden City Hotel on Friday evening, May 9. Initiated in 2011, the Chamber of Commerce’s “President’s Award” recognizes above and beyond volunteer spirit and contributions within the Garden City community and beyond. Not an annual award, it is only presented occasionally, which makes this recognition for Schoelle all the more special.

Bob Schoelle has served as chief administrative officer of the Incorporated Village of Garden City for the past 34 years, working with 18 mayors and many boards of trustees. He has served as a member of both the Village Planning Commission and Board of Police Commissioners. His contributions to numerous village projects have contributed remarkably to the quality of life in the village.

Garvies Point hosts Waldorf parent-child program

Garvies Point Musuem and Preserve, a place known for its Native American history and artifacts, is now home to the Garden City Waldorf School’s Parent-Child Program. The location is an ideal match since the Waldorf educational philosophy enjoys many parallels with the Native American culture exhibited at the museum. The classes are held in the museum’s interactive exhibit room for children, which features a dugout canoe, a wooden wigwam, woven baskets and a model of a native garden. Since the exhibit encourages creative play with natural materials, it is a perfect fit for the Waldorf program which promotes the same.

One of the interesting features of the program is that it is in truth a parent-child class; parents are learning right alongside the children. Children are encouraged to play cooperatively with their peers, while adults learn to knit nearby. Throughout the program, parents are given advice and tips on how to slow the pace of parenting, how to deal with tantrums and manage technology in our lives. “It’s really nice to get good advice on finding a natural rhythm to our lives,” said Laura Franco of Sea Cliff. “I would say the program is very unique in that way.”


Sports

Lady Panthers

start season 7-0

The number two ranked Adelphi Panthers Women’s Lacrosse team has gotten off to a fast start to their 2014 season and show no signs of slowing down. Head Coach Rob Grella, entering his third season at the helm, has led his team to an impressive 7-0 record to kick off their campaign. Six of the Panther’s first seven games have been won in commanding fashion in which they have outscored the opposition by a staggering margin of 122-14.

Last season, the Panthers continued their tradition of playing hard and fighting off tough challenges. They would finish the 2013 season with an impressive 11-1 record within the Northeast Ten Conference and overall at 18-3, making it to their fourth consecutive trip to the NE-10 Conference Championship where they eventually lost to Le Moyne.

Easter Egg Hunt For Pre-K To Grade 5

The Garden City Recreation Department is once again sponsoring the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 19 at Community Park’s fields. This year three hunts will be held at 10 a.m. sharp with three age divisions: preschool to kindergarten, grades 1 and 2; and grades 3 to 5.

Special eggs will be stuffed and hidden for all divisions. Each hunt will also feature a grand prize (an Easter basket filled with goodies) which will go to the youngster who finds the egg marked “#1 Lucky Egg.” For further information about the hunt, please call the recreation department at 516-465-4075.


Calendar

Dinner & A Movie: An Inconvenient Truth

Thursday, April 10

Breakfast With The Easter Bunny

Saturday, April 12

'Needleworks' Exhibit Opens

Through April 30



Columns

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

Sustainable LI: Getting Good Things Done
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

LI’s ‘Most Prominent Lady In Politics’
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com