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Staying In The Lane Of Success

How swimming shaped Coach Sullivan’s life

To say swimming is in Anne Sullivan’s blood is an understatement. Not only does Sullivan coach the boys’ and girls’ swimming teams at Garden City High School, but she also teaches swimming five days a week at Richmond Hill High School in Queens. She has been teaching for 18 years and coaching for even longer, as she puts it “for more than half my life.”

 

Sullivan is a previous student and 1972 graduate of Garden City High School, and she began her swimming career at the Garden City pool. When asked why she chose swimming to invest her life in, she accredited her father, who was also a swimmer. He introduced her to the sport, enabling her to discover her love and talent for it. It’s this dedication that found Anne Sullivan becoming the recent recipient of the Community Achievement Award at the Pineapple Ball, Garden City’s premiere business and social event.

 

When asked what she enjoys about coaching, Sullivan is fairly straightforward. 

 

“I like the challenge that’s put before me. What I like about it is that the kids want to swim for me, and when they come I have variability. Some kids prefer to be in the year-round program, while others don’t.” Sullivan explained that the younger kids begin swimming in the 7th grade, giving them 3 to 4 years to “break out into their own” and hone their skills. 

 

“I like watching that growth,” she said. Sullivan had similar feelings regarding her Queens students, some of whom have never been in water prior to taking her classes. “Some of them will buck you or tell you they aren’t getting in the pool. But eventually you see the progress.”

 

Addressing the difficulties of being a swim coach, Sullivan stated that training can be an issue due to the absence of a pool at the high school. The children practice three mornings a week at Adelphi

University to make up for this. With all of the swim meets and practices being away, this can mean early mornings and late nights for the students. “Sometimes we may not get home until 10,” Sulivan said. “And the kids need to balance their studies with their athletics.”

 

Balance can be a difficult thing to achieve with such long days. However, Sullivan boasts of impressive grades, especially on the girls’ team. In fact, the team was acknowledged for having one of the highest averaged GPAs in the country. In addition, Sullivan claims that her swimmers are also musically and artistically inclined, proving to be a well-rounded and hardworking group. The schedule can be rough on the coach as well. “It makes my day a lot longer,” she said. “But I make it work. I’m in it for the kids.”

 

Sullivan’s job doesn’t end with swimming either. As a coach, she finds that she must teach her kids non-swimming related lessons, which aid them as a team member and will also prepare them for the future. “I give them structure,” she stated. “I give them a sense of responsibility. I expect them to get themselves up if they want to be a part of the team. And if they get sick, I don’t want to hear from parents. They call me.” Sullivan assures that her swimmers are punctual as well, an important quality in any area of life. Furthermore, she makes sure that the kids learn that there will be good and bad days, in swimming and in life. “It’s only going to get harder as you get older,” she said. “And it’s alright. Losing makes you a better person.” 

 

Among some of the proudest moments in Sullivan’s career are the 103 consecutive meets she’s won in the girls’ season, an impressive feat for any sports coach. She has also seen multiple swimmers on her team take state championships including one girl, a freestyler, who won the championship for three consecutive years. Additionally, Sullivan mentioned a competition in which the boys’ swim team defeated the Long Beach High School team.

 

The team was coached by Woody Davis, a reigning champion who coached Sullivan during her own swimming days. “A lot of people don’t know the respect I had for Woody Davis,” Sullivan told me. It is for this reason defeating her former coach was such an eye opener. 

 

But out of every facet of her career, Sullivan stated that she is most proud of her swimmers. “It takes a lot of courage,” she stated. “And they want to improve. They look at some of the others who swim year round, and they may not be as good yet. But they still want to be on the team. I’m proud of that because it takes a lot.” She added that she is pleased the team has been able to stay so good for 20 years.

 

We can only hope that the teams’ legacy continues for many more.

News

Have you considered adding running to your exercise regimen but not sure how to get started? Are you concerned about past injuries? Runners, from experienced to beginner, are sidelined every year due to injury. Physical Therapy Options (PTO) wants to help runners get off to a great start this fall and is pleased to offer the community an opportunity to receive a free comprehensive “Running Analysis.”

 

Physical Therapist Lisa Coors, founder of PTO, views this offering as part of PTO’s mission to help patients live a balanced and healthy lifestyle. 

Yard sale announced

 

The Garden City Bird Sanctuary/Tanners Pond Environmental Center recently announced its annual Fall Benefit Yard Sale. The sale will be held on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., located outdoors inside the front gate at the sanctuary. Vendors are being sought. A 10 x 17 foot selling area is $45 for the day. (Includes space for selling & space to park one car next to selling space)


Sports

Dance Conservatory Program

 

The Garden City Recreation Department’s Dance Conservatory Program is pleased to announce the start of registration for its upcoming 2014-15 season. Director Felicia Lovaglio, along with Mary Searson and the rest of her staff, are excited to start off another fantastic year. The dance conservatory offers classes to Garden City residents ages 3 through adult which are non-performance based. Age is determined by the start date of the desired class. 

 

Note: Registration is by mail only until Sept. 23. Participants MUST be the required age by the start of the program in order to register. 

 

Each session costs $220 for 22 weeks of class. The schedule and fees for this year’s youth classes are as follows (all classes are 55 minutes long unless otherwise noted): 

Fall Children’s Tennis Classes

Registration for the start of the Fall 2014 Indoor Tennis Program for Children has begun at the Community Park Tennis Center. Walkins and non-resident children attending Garden City Public Schools* will be accepted beginning Sept. 11. Please make checks payable to the “Inc. Village of Garden City." Please note—classes are not considered day care and can not be declared for tax exemption.

* Non resident children who would like to register for the tennis program must prove they attend one of the Garden City Public Schools. Proof must accompany registration. An additional $50 fee will pertain to anyone in this category.

10 weeks of classes—classes will begin Thursday, Sept. 18


Calendar

Living With Pulmonary Fibrosis Program - September 18

Harpeth Rising Concert - September 19 

JV Football - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com