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L.I. Modernism: Topic of Historical Society Book Signing

Continuing its popular “Meet the Author” series, The Garden City Historical Society will be hosting an illustrated lecture and book signing on Wednesday, May 21. The presentation features Caroline Rob Zaleski, author of Long Island Modernism 1930-1980 which is published by W.W. Norton and is an essential reference for architecture buffs, historians and everyone who lives on or visits Long Island. The book not only highlights the work within Nassau and Suffolk counties of 25 renowned architects, but also, in a master list, inventories 600 listed buildings and their locations. Zaleski will discuss how she came to work on an architectural field survey for The Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities (SPLIA) and how she discovered genuine surprises about Long Island’s recent past. She will show striking archival photographs from her critically-acclaimed book, which is as much a social history  as an architectural history about world-renowned architects and the aspirations of their clients who built on Long Island.

The featured architects are founders of American Modernism—for example, Richard Neutra, who designed the Swirbul Library on Adelphi University’s Garden City campus and two houses in Suffolk; Marcel Breuer (Geller Houses in Lawrence); Edward Durell Stone (Conger Goodyear House, Old Westbury); William Lescaze (the Calderone Movie Theatre, Hempstead); I.M. Pei (Roosevelt Field Shopping Center); Paul Rudolph, Walter Gropius and the renowned Frank Lloyd Wright.

In addition to focusing on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, Zaleski’s book is complemented by more than 300 striking archival photographs, specially commissioned new photography, and plans. She documents the development of exurbia (the regions beyond established early 20th Century suburbs) and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers and office complexes. She also explains why modernism was embraced by Long Island’s civic, cultural and business leaders during an epoch when open space was prime for development.

Ms. Zaleski’s presentation will emphasize modern buildings as they were originally designed in and near to Garden City. Most notably:

• Richard Neutra’s 1956 Master Plan for Adelphi University and his Swirbul library building (1963), which features a magnificent circular staircase, originally in a bed  of greenery, extending from the first to the second floor. Neutra described the stairway as symbolizing “the spiraled ascent to wisdom.” Brian Lym, dean of University Libraries, today cites Neutra’s determination to design a welcoming space that communicated the importance of knowledge, and provides enjoyment from inside the library of carefully designed courtyards with water features. Filled with light, the building continues to offer a sense of contemplation and respect for learning, he adds.

• Endo Laboratories, an enormous and expensive structure built to house a drug manufacturing factory in Garden City, designed by Paul Rudolph. It was a building admired by the architectural press in the early 1960s, but disliked by Robert Moses, the Titan of Long Island’s master planning. He ordered that trees be placed along the Meadowbrook Parkway, so that drivers would not see Endo Laboratories along the way. The interiors in the executive suites were extraordinary, shot full of color and textures, and were, above all, futuristic.

• The legendary and lavish 1954 Calderone Theatre—the second largest movie theater in the East after Radio City in Manhattan—designed by William Lescaze. People came from all over Long Island to see its “Modern as Tomorrow” interiors and to ride the escalators, the first ever in a movie theatre in the United States.

• One of Long Island’s iconic developments, the original Roosevelt Field Shopping Center, from 1954, designed by the young I.M. Pei (famous now for the National Gallery in Washington and work at the Louvre in Paris). Today Roosevelt Field strikes visitors as just another shopping mall. However, at its beginnings, the mall was innovative and artistically and architecturally distinguished. It was America’s largest and most progressive shopping mall, built to be a kind of suburban equivalent to a medieval town square with something for everyone.

The free event takes place at 7:30 p.m. in The Garden City Historical Society Museum on 109 Eleventh St. in Garden City. Guests are invited to chat with the author and enjoy light refreshments following the program. Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

News

North Shore-LIJ’s Cushing Neuroscience Institute (CNI) recently announced that Garden City resident Richard E. Temes, MD, MS, has been appointed director of the Center for Neurocritical Care at North Shore University Hospital and assistant professor of neurology, neurological surgery and internal medicine at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

“Dr. Temes is a nationally recognized leader in neurocritical care and we are delighted to have him on board to spearhead our efforts in further expanding the neurocritical care services program,” said Raj K. Narayan, MD, chair of neurosurgery at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center and CNI’s director. For the past seven years, Dr. Temes served as director of the neurocritical care program he founded at Rush Medical Center in Chicago, Ill. He also served as the hospital’s medical director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit and as director of the Therapeutic Hypothermia Service. Under Dr. Temes’ leadership, he established Rush’s neurological emergencies transfer center, which grew to transfer 1,200 patients annually from over 30 institutions throughout southern Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and western Michigan.

‘Landscape-altering’ bug creeping north

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of the Island designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

Garden City falls to Brentwood

after beating Farmingdale

The Farmingdale Baseball League recently capped off its fourth annual 9/11 baseball tournament with a series of championship games, to ultimately determine which Long Island town reigns supreme. On Aug. 16, teams from 8U to 14U fought tooth and nail for the ultimate prize.

One of the most exciting games was the evening 14U championship match-up between the Garden City Warriors and Brentwood Braves.

Fall Roller Hockey Programs Announced

The Garden City Recreation and Parks Department will once again offer various roller hockey programs this fall for both youth & adults who reside in the Inc. Village of Garden City. Whether you played in the past or looking to get involved, there is no better time to sign up and experience all the fun. All programs take place at the roller rink located at Community Park. Please note at this time, the recreation department is just announcing its programs. Fees and registration information will be announced at a later date.

This season, the roller hockey programs are broken down into grades. Please pay careful attention as grades and dates/times have changed:


Calendar

Alice in Nanoland

Thursday, August 28

Nature’s Nighttime Noises

Saturday, August 30

Art With A French Twist

Thursday, September 11



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com