Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

What The Future Holds

Tech task force committee presents findings  

Garden City schools, like countless others, have been on the information superhighway for quite some time. Now the question becomes, how best to travel that highway in the years to come?

Last spring, the board of education asked for volunteers to form a technology task force committee to ‘identify trends in technology and determine their potential impact’ on schools. A few dozen faculty, students, and community members banded together, and the committee presented their report to the board at a public work session that was held on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at the middle school.

“[This update] gives the board a sense of where we want to go, what the [technology] field is doing...and some possible road maps on how we’re going to get there,” said district superintendent Dr. Robert Feirsen.

The task force was divided up into three subcommittees: Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), which focused on social media and how students will use new technology; Digital Content, which examined the role of teachers in selecting classroom management platforms, and Technical Advisory, which dealt with technology infrastructure on the district level.

Social media and smart devices can be powerful tools in the hands of students, and not necessarily in a positive way.

High school librarian Margaux Calemmo brought forth the recommendations of the BYOD committee, which would include the registration of all personally owned devices with the district. Students would be permitted to the school’s secured wireless network only, with no access to a private 4G network, for example. This would ensure that only district approved websites could be accessed. The committee did recommend that BYOD privileges be extended to grades 5-12, but that social media sites are to be used for educational purposes only. Twitter, Google Drive and YouTube are the free sites the committee suggests.

High school science teacher Michael Stano was among those from the Digital Content committee on hand. His group has recommended Edmodo.com as the district-wide classroom management platform.

“Students often say, I don’t know what the homework is, I didn’t see it on the board, the website wasn’t working... I could give you a thousand excuses,” Stano said. “Edmodo takes all those excuses away.”

Stano did say that more staff development is needed as new technology is put in place. He would like to see a full-time technology integration staff developer brought on board to assist teachers in implementing technology. Also, a potential collaboration with Adelphi University’s school of education would allow college students to ‘teach the teachers’ about technology in the classroom.

No technology advancement is possible without the backbone of a functioning network infrastructure. All cabling installation of wireless access points has been completed, and the BYOD will slowly be rolled out over the next couple years. The Technology task force says the current technical support system is inefficient in that highly technical, along with basic tasks, are handled by the same staff. They would like to see technology aides hired for each school, along with the creation of a ‘GC Tech Squad’, which will be made up of high school tech savvy students who can help device users with any problem.

Of course, there’s always the question of money. The district-wide tech budget has not changed for several years and the task force as a whole says an increase is necessary. Expenditures on new laptops/tablets, staff development and wireless licensing would increase the budget over the next few years.

The school board was in agreement that there’s no slowing down technology, but that they would have to decide which expenditures are needed and which are not.

Dr. Feirsen says technology will not fully replace traditional instruction or staff-created content, and that costs, along with monitoring of student online activity, are issues the board will be mulling over as they review the task force findings.

However, it should be clear, according to board trustee Tom Pinou, that his board is in fact on-board, online, onward into the future.

“Information is power, if we can deliver it the right way to our students,” Pinou said. “If we can give that technology edge to our students, that will have a monumental effect on us all.”

News

North Shore-LIJ’s Cushing Neuroscience Institute (CNI) recently announced that Garden City resident Richard E. Temes, MD, MS, has been appointed director of the Center for Neurocritical Care at North Shore University Hospital and assistant professor of neurology, neurological surgery and internal medicine at the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

“Dr. Temes is a nationally recognized leader in neurocritical care and we are delighted to have him on board to spearhead our efforts in further expanding the neurocritical care services program,” said Raj K. Narayan, MD, chair of neurosurgery at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center and CNI’s director. For the past seven years, Dr. Temes served as director of the neurocritical care program he founded at Rush Medical Center in Chicago, Ill. He also served as the hospital’s medical director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit and as director of the Therapeutic Hypothermia Service. Under Dr. Temes’ leadership, he established Rush’s neurological emergencies transfer center, which grew to transfer 1,200 patients annually from over 30 institutions throughout southern Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and western Michigan.

‘Landscape-altering’ bug creeping north

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of the Island designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

Garden City falls to Brentwood

after beating Farmingdale

The Farmingdale Baseball League recently capped off its fourth annual 9/11 baseball tournament with a series of championship games, to ultimately determine which Long Island town reigns supreme. On Aug. 16, teams from 8U to 14U fought tooth and nail for the ultimate prize.

One of the most exciting games was the evening 14U championship match-up between the Garden City Warriors and Brentwood Braves.

Fall Roller Hockey Programs Announced

The Garden City Recreation and Parks Department will once again offer various roller hockey programs this fall for both youth & adults who reside in the Inc. Village of Garden City. Whether you played in the past or looking to get involved, there is no better time to sign up and experience all the fun. All programs take place at the roller rink located at Community Park. Please note at this time, the recreation department is just announcing its programs. Fees and registration information will be announced at a later date.

This season, the roller hockey programs are broken down into grades. Please pay careful attention as grades and dates/times have changed:


Calendar

Alice in Nanoland

Thursday, August 28

Nature’s Nighttime Noises

Saturday, August 30

Art With A French Twist

Thursday, September 11



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com