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Crossing Borders: Technology To The Rescue

Local robotics team reaches around the globe

An enterprising group of 11- and 12-year-olds from Stewart Manor, Garden City and Westbury who call themselves the Robotic Rebels competed in the 10th Annual Long Island FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Lego League (FLL) Championship Tournament held on March 2 at Longwood High School in Middle Island. The team gained entry into the championship round after they won the 2nd Place Champion’s Award at a qualifying tournament held in Central Islip last month.

Guided by coaches Steve Giammona and Brian Sanguyu, team members Keith DeStaebler, Steven Giammona, Justin MacFall, Christina Marciano, Ronnie Marciano, Kevin McGoldrick and Anthony Sanguyu worked for six months to build and program a robot to perform challenging missions and completed an in-depth research project to identify a problem and develop an innovative solution with regard to this year’s FLL theme: Nature’s Fury.

The team had to identify a region that was impacted by a natural disaster, recognize a problem that resulted from the disaster, and invent a solution to help solve the problem. Inspired by Coach Sanguyu who was born and raised in the Philippines, the team focused their efforts on Tyhpoon Haiyan, which slammed the Philippines last November. The Rebels learned that of the 100 million people who live in the region, 68 million have cell phones. The impoverished region is known as the “Text Messaging Capital of the World” because inhabitants rely heavily on texting to communicate, as texts cost only 2 cents each. Through their research, the Rebels also learned that bicycles are a primary source of transportation for Filipinos.

After Typhoon Haiyan — known as “Yolanda” to Filipinos — hit, thousands died, hundreds of thousands were left homeless, and millions were left without power. No power equated to no way to communicate to reach out to family members and to seek food and aid. The Robotic Rebels considered the region’s economic inability to purchase generators, as many of their own families did in the wake of Superstorm Sandy last year. They also considered which resources remained in the aftermath of Yolanda and homed in on bicycles.

After many brainstorming sessions, the team invented an inexpensive pedal-powered cell phone charger, aptly named the “No-Landa.” They calculated how long and how fast one would have to pedal to charge a cell phone and determined anyone, regardless of age, size or strength, can operate the No-Landa successfully. The No-Landa consists of a wood stand, which can be made by hand and on which the bicycle rests and a rolling 10-watt generator, which gets attached to the stand. The team built a prototype and demonstrated its use before a panel of judges at the tournament.

To gauge the feasibility of their proposed solution, the Rebels shared their research and the No-Landa with many people, including NYPD and FDNY officers, a software engineer, a mechanical engineer, a doctor, and most impressively a Filipino native who lives here now. The Rebels invited Fr. Rudy Pesongco, associate pastor of St. Anne’s Church in Garden City who emigrated from the Philippines, to one of their practice meetings and presented their solution to him. He endorsed the No-Landa, saying, “I like very much the idea because in times of emergencies [like the typhoon] we lost everything, no electric power. But, because of this bicycle-powered charger that you invented that can generate power in order for the cell phone to [work], then I subscribe to this idea, which is very practical and very easy to follow.” He added that he uses text messaging when he visits his family in the Philippines because it’s cheap and fast.

A Filipino native himself, Sanguyu and his family visit the Philippines every other summer. Prior to each visit, he collects clothing and other goods from colleagues and friends and ships them to his former community. This past summer, he requested used computer equipment. Upon his arrival, he built a 30-seat computer lab at Mabalacat Elementary School. Little did he know at the time that this very lab would assist the Robotic Rebels in sharing their innovative solution with peers across the globe. The Rebels sent a video presentation of the No-Landa to a sixth-grade class at Mabalacat Elementary School and asked their Filipino peers to reply to the following questions: Do you like our innovative solution, the No-Landa? If yes, why do you like it? Would you use it? What, if anything, would you change about the No-Landa. They replied with their own video for the Rebels, saying, “We like your idea of a pedal-powered cell phone charger because it is easy and convenient to use. It is very cheap. It is not dangerous to use even for kids like us.”

This was the Robotic Rebels’ second year competing in the FLL. They have embraced the league’s Core Values, including teamwork, “cooperation” and “gracious professionalism” and have shown by example their team motto: It’s the journey, not the destination.

News

Blakeman and Rice to speak at Chamber Luncheon

On Sept. 24, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Garden City Chamber of Commerce will be hosting its season kick-off luncheon program at the Garden City Hotel, where the keynote speakers will be the Democratic and Republican nominees for the U.S. Congress in New York’s  Fourth Congressional District. Bruce A. Blakeman (R), Conservative and Independence nominee and Kathleen Rice (D), Nassau County District Attorney, will speak separately expressing their respective views on the future of the district and impact upon its business community. This is not to be a debate.

John F. Collins, president and CEO of Winthrop-University Hospital, recently announced Garden City resident Maureen E. Clancy and East Williston’s Dr. Kevin P. Marzo, will be the honorees for the Hospital’s 23rd Annual Gala, “An Evening in Tuscany,” taking place on Saturday, Oct. 18, at the RXR Plaza in Uniondale.

“As champions for Winthrop, Mrs. Clancy and Dr. Marzo have demonstrated unwavering commitment to the hospital and to the communities it serves and we are pleased to honor them at this year’s gala,” said Collins.  


Sports

Fall Children’s Tennis Classes

Registration for the start of the Fall 2014 Indoor Tennis Program for Children has begun at the Community Park Tennis Center. Walkins and non-resident children attending Garden City Public Schools* will be accepted beginning Sept. 11. Please make checks payable to the “Inc. Village of Garden City." Please note—classes are not considered day care and can not be declared for tax exemption.

* Non resident children who would like to register for the tennis program must prove they attend one of the Garden City Public Schools. Proof must accompany registration. An additional $50 fee will pertain to anyone in this category.

10 weeks of classes—classes will begin Thursday, Sept. 18

Locals run for themselves

and a cause in triathalon

At 6 a.m on a blustery Saturday morning, 1600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay Triathlon and Tri-Relay Race. The participants were drawn from a wide age range. They came from all over Long Island and upstate New York, a few were from out of state, and in some cases, had disabilities. But they all came with one goal in mind — to finish.

Jeffrey Hussey, a 28-year-old Garden City resident, has done this race three times and this was his fifth triathlon this summer.


Calendar

9/11 Memorial Program

Thursday, September 11

Zing Went The Strings

Friday, September 19

Marvelous Movie Matinee

Monday, September 15



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com