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The Importance Of ‘Everyday Heroes’

In honor of National Red Cross Month, we would like to recognize our Everyday Heroes from Long Island who reach out to help their neighbors when they need it most.

These everyday heroes help disaster victims get back on the road to recovery. They donate lifesaving blood. They help brighten the day of injured service members who are far from home. They take lifesaving skills classes; they then step forward to help a heart attack victim or to save a drowning child.

March is the perfect time to become part of the Red Cross. Long Island residents can sign up to take a class or volunteer their time. Families or household members can work together on an emergency preparedness plan. Individuals can give blood to help those in need, or make a financial donation that will help the Red Cross carry out its humanitarian programs and services.

Last year on Long Island, the Red Cross helped nearly 1,000 residents following local disasters. This does not include the thousands of Long Islanders we assisted in the aftermath of Sandy. We also helped hundreds of military families and trained more than 45,000 people in lifesaving skills. What’s more, Long Islanders donated nearly 3,500 units of blood at Red Cross blood drives. Each unit of blood donated has the potential to save up to three people.

National Red Cross Month celebrates the Red Cross, its lifesaving mission, and all those who support our mission. We are grateful to our supporters for their generosity, which enables us to continue our vital programs and services. We encourage everyone to become an Everyday Hero during Red Cross Month by joining with us to help our neighbors in need.

To learn more about our mission visit, www.redcross.org.

John Miller is the CEO of Long Island Red Cross

News

Tammany Hall is an essential part of the vocabulary of New York City politics. For many, Tammany Hall and political corruption are synonymous. For others, Tammany Hall was a lifesaver tossed into the turbulent and unforgiving sea of 19th- and early 20th-century New York City. The author of a new book about Tammany Hall, Terry Golway, will speak about these complexities at the Wednesday, Nov. 12 meeting of the Irish Cultural Society of the Garden City area.

Golway’s book Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics has been well received in book reviews. His talk will acknowledge the misgovernment of Tammany Hall with its creation of “Boss” Tweed as the very face of political corruption. But he will also argue that Tammany Hall was an influence on the progressive legislation which helped working people, the Irish among them, to form a vibrant middle class in the United States.

On Oct. 23, Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced the arrest of a Floral Park woman for stealing nearly $700,000 from a longtime employer, as well as more than $10,000 from a new employer, by writing herself checks drawn from company bank accounts.

Deborah Tangredi was arrested and arraigned on Oct. 23 before Nassau District Court Judge Joy Watson on the following charges:


Calendar

Harvest Fair

Saturday, November 1

West End Civic Meets

Thursday, November 6

Floral Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, November 5



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com