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Superintendents Join To Restore Youth Service Programs

Long Island school district leaders call on NC to restore $8 million in funding

Local school district superintendents on Tuesday, Oct. 2 called on Nassau County to restore youth and family programs that were cut or eliminated from the county budget on July 5. Representatives from Elmont, Great Neck, Long Beach, Massapequa, Mineola, Uniondale and Westbury protested the decision to slash nearly $8 million in program funding that went to counseling, tutoring, crisis intervention, after school programs, among other areas.

These programs were the victim of the ongoing tug-of-war between party lines in the county concerning borrowing and redistricting. Organizations across Nassau County, like the Gateway Youth Outreach in Elmont and Mineola Youth and Family Services in Mineola were blindsided when the cut came down three months ago.

The New York State Afterschool Network (NYSAN) sent a letter to Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano and the entire county legislature on Sept. 28, in support of restoring the programs. NYSAN Executive Director Nora Niedzielski said the programs, “allow parents to work without worrying about their children’s health, development and safety and [the programs] reduce juvenile crime,” the letter read.

Local school and community leaders agreed. Coalition of Nassau County Youth Agencies President Peter Levy feels the programs were the victim of political struggles in the county.

“We cannot be used as pawns in political games,” he said. “School superintendents are well aware of the negative impact on their school communities due to the loss of vital services provided to their students and we appreciate their partnership in this campaign.”

According to GYO Director Pat Boyle, about 800 Elmont youths once attended the Gateway Youth Outreach Center, but county cuts made the center scale back to 100 students in 2012. The center opened in 1983 as EYO, but later changed to GYO in 1998.

“We’re left with a tremendous amount of latchkey kids,” said Al Harper, superintendent of the Elmont School District (ESD), which enrolls about 3,700 students. “Who knows where these children are?”

The ESD faced the possibility of a complete failed budget last June, after it failed at the polls on May 15. The district needed 60 percent of voter approval to pass the budget, which it attained on June 19.

“Elmont is a vibrant, working class community,” Harper said. “Parents sometimes put in long hours at work in order to pay bills and survive in this economy. Gateway Youth Outreach provides afterschool care for our children. Parents were left without afterschool childcare. This was very unfair to take away at the last minute. We need this type of support for our children.”

Activists, youth organizations and local community fixtures have been pleading for a restoration of funds since the summer, but this marks the first time school heads have banded together to force the issue. The educators were lobbying for a specific area or program, but had one common goal.

“I came here to support Mineola Youth and Family Services,” Mineola Superintendent Michael Nagler said. “To speak pragmatically, we understand that we all have to produce budgets. In our budgets we try to make sure we understand all the consequences of our reductions. In this case, 38 youth and family service programs in one pen stroke affects a lot of kids in a lot of communities. It is great to have another place for kids to go to when we can’t provide the service. There’s no dollar amount that will speak to the value of that as a society.”

Executive Director of Mineola Youth and Family Services Cristina Balbo is still working with local youth, without pay, on her own time, for the good of the children. She said, “Our agency is basically closed. However, I still volunteer my time with no pay, along with two or three volunteers from the agency to keep the clients safe.”

Balbo is hoping the funding gets restored. She recently met with Nassau County Legislator Rich Nicolello and State Senator Jack Martins to discuss the program cuts.

“Does anyone have an understanding that these agencies are not going to be around?” Balbo stated.

“To wipe out all of them, it doesn’t make a lot of sense,” Nagler stated.

News

The Nassau County Robbery Squad detectives are investigating a bank robbery that occurred on Wednesday, Sept. 17 which occurred at 5:40 p.m. in Floral Park.

According to detectives, a black, male subject entered the Capital One Bank, 170 Tulip Ave. and approached a teller. The subject produced a handgun and demanded money. After obtaining an undisclosed about of cash, the subject fled the bank and was last seen heading southbound on Plainfield Ave. The subject was described as being 35 to 40 years old, 6’ tall, stocky build, wearing a dark colored baseball cap, sunglasses, a white T-shirt and dark pants, During the incident there were four employees and one customer present. No injuries were reported.

Home security company Safe Choice Security recently compiled a list of the 29 safest places to live in New York State, and Floral Park made the ranks as one of four places in Nassau County. Using 2012 FCI crime statistics to analyze violent and property crime rates in the area, Safe Choice Security said it ranks each community based on its potential risk.


Calendar

Chamber of Commerce’s Networking Event

Thursday, October 2

West End Civic Association To Meet

Thursday, October 2

Town of Hempstead’s E-Cycling Collection

Sunday, October 5



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