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E-Cigs Banned In Sewanhaka Schools

The Sewanhaka Central High School District recently amended its student code of conduct to include the ban of e-cigarettes at its five high schools. School officials say measures were taken to address the issue.

“Some of the principals expressed a discomfort with attempting to discipline students when there was nothing in the code of conduct which would prohibit the possession of an e-cigs, rolling papers or things of that sort,” said Sewanhaka School Board President David Fowler. “The e-cigarette particular is something that has been brought up.” According to Fowler, student suspensions have been challenged during the school year, with children arguing certain items are not illegal paraphernalia.

The district’s amended code of conduct states students would be subject to disciplinary action if caught “smoking a cigarette, cigar, pipe, e-cigarette, vaporizer pipes/pens, and/or hookah pipes/pens.” The code also includes bans on “using chewing or smokeless tobacco.”

“The [revised] code does deal with those issues,” Fowler said.

One listing in the code bans “possession of drug paraphernalia.” The district added, “and/or smoking paraphernalia, including but not limited to, e-cigarettes, vaporizers, hookah pipes, bongs, grinders, snorters, rolling papers, scales, cigarette lighters, glassine bags or bags used for packaging and/or distribution of drugs.”

Sewanhaka joins a trend that’s sweeping Long Island in e-cigarette banning. Lynbrook, Island Trees, Middle County, Central Islip, and Jericho school districts recently put a stop on e-cigarettes. Experts fear students are being pushed towards more dangerous, life-threatening behavior with e-cigarette use.

According to lead researcher Dr. Lauren Dutra, from the University of California-San Francisco, "E-cigarettes are likely to be gateway devices for nicotine addiction among youth.”

Dutra argues that manufacturers of the electronic cigarette have included alluring flavors, such as bubble gum, cherry, or coffee, which appeal to the youth community. The study also showed that since e-cigarettes contain the same addicting properties as tobacco, it didn’t take long for teens to develop a nicotine dependency and move on to the traditional cigarette.

Another study by the national Center for Disease Control (CDC) showed the number of calls to poison control centers involving e-cigarette liquids rose from one per month in Sept. 2010, up to 215 calls per month in Feb. 2014. According to the CDC, poisoning from e-cigarettes can occur either through ingestion, inhalation or absorption through the skin or eyes.

“Use of these products is skyrocketing and these poisonings will continue,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden. “E-cigarette liquids, as currently sold are a threat to small children because they are not required to be childproof, and they come in candy and fruit flavors that are appealing to children.”

News

Tammany Hall is an essential part of the vocabulary of New York City politics. For many, Tammany Hall and political corruption are synonymous. For others, Tammany Hall was a lifesaver tossed into the turbulent and unforgiving sea of 19th- and early 20th-century New York City. The author of a new book about Tammany Hall, Terry Golway, will speak about these complexities at the Wednesday, Nov. 12 meeting of the Irish Cultural Society of the Garden City area.

Golway’s book Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics has been well received in book reviews. His talk will acknowledge the misgovernment of Tammany Hall with its creation of “Boss” Tweed as the very face of political corruption. But he will also argue that Tammany Hall was an influence on the progressive legislation which helped working people, the Irish among them, to form a vibrant middle class in the United States.

On Oct. 23, Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced the arrest of a Floral Park woman for stealing nearly $700,000 from a longtime employer, as well as more than $10,000 from a new employer, by writing herself checks drawn from company bank accounts.

Deborah Tangredi was arrested and arraigned on Oct. 23 before Nassau District Court Judge Joy Watson on the following charges:


Calendar

Harvest Fair

Saturday, November 1

West End Civic Meets

Thursday, November 6

Floral Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, November 5



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