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Local High School Student Attends ‘Med School’

This summer camp includes X-rays and a visit to the morgue

For Floral Park resident Hirra Arain, the field of science has always seemed promising. As the 17-year-old’s senior year at Sewanhaka High School approaches, she is already looking at medical school programs, and during her summer vacation she got a week-long close-up view of her future field of study.

 

Arain, along with 23 other area high school students, recently took part in a Medical School/Camp Program sponsored by Adelphi University and Winthrop-University Hospital. 

 

“It was amazing,” Arain said as her week at the Adelphi campus came to a close. “I learned a lot about college for next year.”

 

The idea for the camp was developed in part by Dr. James D. Capozzi, chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Winthrop Hospital.“Summer camps usually are sports related,” said Dr. Capozzi. “I thought it would be a good idea to have one for those interested in science and medicine. This way, kids who are interested in the field have a chance to see what really happens in medicine.”

 

The program covered a variety of topics relating to healthcare and science. Students heard from healthcare professionals and got hands-on experience with surgical procedures under the guidance of Dr. Capozzi.

 

Students sawed bones with an electrical surgical saw and learned to suture a wound using real surgical needles and sutures. The patient for suturing exercise: an orange. They even visited the hospital morgue.

 

“We want to get kids early,” said Dr. Capozzi. “The goal is to give students an idea of what the pathway is and break any misconceptions about the field. A lot of kids may wonder what’s available in medicine, but there are so many different fields. There is so much in medicine for kids to learn.”

 

The students also received frank advice about what’s required for a career in the field.

 

“Anything in medicine is a lot of work,” said Dr. Capozzi. “You give up your whole early adulthood to do it. You’re giving up nine, 10, 11 years of your life, and you need to have a desire to delay gratification. You need to have that drive to do it, and if you don’t, then you’re not going to make it.”

 

The students who took part in the program appeared to have this drive, as it was not easy to get into the program. Applicants were required to write an essay detailing their interest in science and provide a letter of recommendation from a science teacher or guidance counselor addressing the student’s level of academic success and maturity. While more than 80 students applied, only 24 made it.

 

The program also hit on topics such as human genes, medical imaging technology, cancer therapeutics and oncology.

 

“What I hope the kids get out of the camp is excitement and interest,” said Dr. Capozzi. “It’s exciting to see some enthusiasm in the medical field.”

 

As the program wrapped up, Arain, who hopes to study either dermatology or pathology, was both excited and interested.

 

“My most rewarding experience was going to the morgue and seeing what I learned in class and bringing it there to Winthrop,” she said, referring to one of her science classes.

“Science is very promising. It really is our future. It will never stop being important.”

News

On Saturday, July 26, Floral Park and Hance Family Foundation supporters from more than 23 states, including from Michigan, Louisiana, and Arizona, from three countries joined in the remembrance of Emma, Alyson, and Katie Hance in the foundation’s annual Day of Remembrance. Green ribbons and balloons were tied generously around trees, lampposts, railing and garden stakes, celebrating the lives of the sisters, gone too soon.

The foundation’s Facebook page was loaded with photos and prayers and messages from around the globe, from those who participated in some way, remembering the sisters who died in a car accident on July 26, 2009, at ages 8, 7, and 5.

Bright blue eyes, a full head of hair, beautiful smile, and full of energy. At 5 years old, Ethan Demmers is possibly at the healthiest he will be in his life. Ethan was recently diagnosed with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD). Typically, people with this disease live only into their 20s. Over the next few years, the disease will slowly attack every muscle in Ethan’s body, eventually causing him to permanently be in a wheelchair. Ethan’s parents are not ready to give up their hope for a cure. They are fully committed to helping find a cure for this deadly illness, not just for their own son, but for all others suffering as well.

Ethan’s father, Dustin Demmers, is an English teacher at Floral Park Memorial High School. To the student body, Demmers can be described as funny, happy, wacky, wild, crazy, and unique among other adjectives. Demmers can be found smiling through the halls, making jokes over the loudspeakers, or making his class into the ideal environment for learning.


Calendar

Free Barbeque Dinner For Local Veterans

Thursday, August 14

Hockey Team Concert Benefit

Friday, August 15

Summer Recreation Awards Ceremony

Thursday, August 21



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