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Local High School Student Attends ‘Med School’

This summer camp includes X-rays and a visit to the morgue

For Floral Park resident Hirra Arain, the field of science has always seemed promising. As the 17-year-old’s senior year at Sewanhaka High School approaches, she is already looking at medical school programs, and during her summer vacation she got a week-long close-up view of her future field of study.

 

Arain, along with 23 other area high school students, recently took part in a Medical School/Camp Program sponsored by Adelphi University and Winthrop-University Hospital. 

 

“It was amazing,” Arain said as her week at the Adelphi campus came to a close. “I learned a lot about college for next year.”

 

The idea for the camp was developed in part by Dr. James D. Capozzi, chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Winthrop Hospital.“Summer camps usually are sports related,” said Dr. Capozzi. “I thought it would be a good idea to have one for those interested in science and medicine. This way, kids who are interested in the field have a chance to see what really happens in medicine.”

 

The program covered a variety of topics relating to healthcare and science. Students heard from healthcare professionals and got hands-on experience with surgical procedures under the guidance of Dr. Capozzi.

 

Students sawed bones with an electrical surgical saw and learned to suture a wound using real surgical needles and sutures. The patient for suturing exercise: an orange. They even visited the hospital morgue.

 

“We want to get kids early,” said Dr. Capozzi. “The goal is to give students an idea of what the pathway is and break any misconceptions about the field. A lot of kids may wonder what’s available in medicine, but there are so many different fields. There is so much in medicine for kids to learn.”

 

The students also received frank advice about what’s required for a career in the field.

 

“Anything in medicine is a lot of work,” said Dr. Capozzi. “You give up your whole early adulthood to do it. You’re giving up nine, 10, 11 years of your life, and you need to have a desire to delay gratification. You need to have that drive to do it, and if you don’t, then you’re not going to make it.”

 

The students who took part in the program appeared to have this drive, as it was not easy to get into the program. Applicants were required to write an essay detailing their interest in science and provide a letter of recommendation from a science teacher or guidance counselor addressing the student’s level of academic success and maturity. While more than 80 students applied, only 24 made it.

 

The program also hit on topics such as human genes, medical imaging technology, cancer therapeutics and oncology.

 

“What I hope the kids get out of the camp is excitement and interest,” said Dr. Capozzi. “It’s exciting to see some enthusiasm in the medical field.”

 

As the program wrapped up, Arain, who hopes to study either dermatology or pathology, was both excited and interested.

 

“My most rewarding experience was going to the morgue and seeing what I learned in class and bringing it there to Winthrop,” she said, referring to one of her science classes.

“Science is very promising. It really is our future. It will never stop being important.”

News

Girl Scouts of Nassau County recently recognized Krista Longobardi and Meaghan Smith, both students at Floral Park Memorial High School, for individually earning their Gold Award, the highest and most prestigious award within the Girl Scouts Organization. In order to be eligible for a Gold Award, a Girl Scout must have completed two Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador Journeys or have already received the Silver Award and completed one additional Journey. The Gold Award also requires the completion of 80-hours or more of an individual leadership Take Action project that makes a sustainable and measurable impact on an important issue, or need in the community, and that serves to educate and inspire others in the community.

Longobardi’s Girl Scout Gold Award Take Action Project, Pick Your Pet, teaches children ages 5-12 the benefits of owning a pet. She was able to educate her community on the adoption process, the best pet for your household, and how adoption can save an animal’s life. Longobardi’s love of animals made it easy to spread knowledge on this topic. She improved her communication and public speaking skills as a result of her project since she spoke in front of her community leaders and peers.

Saint Mary’s High School will host the 22nd Annual Don Monti Memorial Golf Classic and Fall Alumni Dinner on Thursday, Sept. 25, at Plandome Country Club. Following the golf outing, a dinner reception will take place where Tom Raleigh, of Floral Park, will be honored with the Timothy J. Coughlin ’76 Memorial Award for Outstanding Contributions to St. Mary’s High School.

Raleigh has deep connections to St. Mary’s High School and the Manhasset community. Four of Raleigh’s five children went to St. Mary’s: Tom, Jr. ’88, Brian, ’91, Katie ’93, Kevin ’95. Raleigh has been a loyal St. Mary’s advocate both as a past parent and former coach.  


Calendar

Town of Hempstead Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 2

Floral Park Senior Citizens’ Picnic

Tuesday, September 2

Village of Floral Park Board of Trustees To Meet

Tuesday, September 2



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