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Letter: Pictures Enjoying Warm Weather

Pictures published in the most recent Farmingdale Observer showing Main Street on a warm weekend were a welcome relief to seemingly endless snow-filled pictures. The photo of a young man with a dog was made even better by its caption; “Rocco, the friendly pitt bull and his guardian Gerard Lombardo.”  

 

In 10 simple words, this caption expressed two very basic, and yet very significant, principles which animal welfare supporters have been trying to bring to the mainstream for many years:  First, that animals are more than just property which is “owned;” and Second, that dogs’ temperaments cannot be pigeon holed based upon their breeds.

 

Although it is contrary to what any person who loves their pets knows, by and large New York State law treats animals as personal property, not as the sentient beings that they are. For instance, in cases involving animal custody disputes, judges most often examine indicia of ownership of the animal (who paid for the animal, who obtained its license, who regularly bought the food and paid the vet bills, etc.) rather than the best interests of the animal, as is done in cases of child custody disputes.    

 

There are exceptions to this, most notably laws which prohibit cruelty to animals.  So, while you may smash a lamp that you own against a wall without suffering any legal repercussions, if you were to do that with an animal, you would be subject to criminal prosecution and you likely would be charged with a felony if the animal involved were a companion animal, as defined in the pertinent statute.  New York State law also allows for the establishment of pet trusts so that people may leave money for the care of their pets, appoint a person to care for their pets and appoint a guardian to ensure that the animal is cared for well. There is no similar law trust relating to any other type of “property.”    

 

By identifying Gerard Lombardo as the friendly pit bull’s guardian, not owner, the caption expressly recognized what many of us feel. . . that while we care for our pets and protect them, we do not own them because they are more than just property.

 

Similarly, by describing the dog as a “friendly pit bull,” the caption contradicted the misconception that pit bulls are a mean breed of dog.  Any person who works with dogs can affirm that it is the person who trains, or fails to train the dog, and not the breed of dog or even the dog itself, who is responsible for a dog’s bad behavior.   New York State recognizes this principle, too, by making it illegal to pass a law or ordinance which singles out any specific breed of dog for special (usually restrictive) treatment.    Thus, it is illegal for a governmental licensing authority to charge a higher fee to license a  pit bull, German Shephard, Akita or other breed of dog often thought of as “dangerous” than it charges for other breeds of dog.  Similarly, it is illegal to prevent residents from “owning” certain breeds of dogs.

 

I am just one Farmingdale resident who tries to make a difference for animals, but I wanted to express my very heartfelt thanks to whomever supplied this Friday’s Farmingdale Observer with the photos and their thoughtful captions.   You have done more to promote animal welfare than you can possibly know. 

 

Stacey Tranchina


News

These days Long Island residents are trying to save a buck whenever and wherever they can, especially when it comes to property taxes. To try and lend a helping hand, Republican Sen. Kemp Hannon and Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano recently teamed up for a property tax exemption workshop at the Farmingdale Public Library.

 

Communications Director Randolph Yunker with the Nassau County Department of Assessment explained that the workshops, which are held throughout the year in various communities, are a collaborative effort to bring the Nassau County Department of Assessments operations from Mineola to different communities, such as Farmingdale. He added that applications were on-hand in case any attendees were first-timers or pursuing a renewal of an existing exemption. 

If you stopped by the Farmingdale Public Library this past week, perhaps you noticed all of the paintings and art pieces currently on display. For the entire month of July, the library will feature the many styles of artist/poet Ruth Lawrence.

 

“I’ve been exhibiting for quite a few years,” said Lawrence, “I am always happy to show my work.”

 

Lawrence, 87, of East Meadow, said she first began painting at just 12 years old. She recalls, at the time her sister had been dating someone who worked at an art supply store, and had gotten her some oil-based paints as a present. 


Sports

Throughout the summer, the Farmingdale Observer will feature the box scores from the Farmingdale Baseball League Inc.’s 9/11 Baseball Tournament. 

July 6

Farmingdale Greendogs 7 - Seaford Vikings 6 (8U)

 

Syosset Cubs 18 - Plainview Hawks 1 (12U)

Runners and walkers from Farmingdale and all over Long Island and beyond are invited to join in the fun on one of the most unusual 5 Kilometer courses on Long Island at the Saturday, August 9th Lynn, Gartner, Dunne & Covello Sands Point Sprint.

 

The Run presents the Long Island running community with an opportunity to traverse a unique combination of paved paths and runner-friendly woodland trails at the Sands Point Preserve. 

 

The leading Nassau County law firm of Lynn, Gartner, Dunne & Covello has signed on to be the new lead sponsor of the event, with partner John Dunne and his wife planning on running the 5K distance. The Lynbrook Runner’s Stop will be back as the presenting sponsor.  


Calendar

Wounded Warrior Dinner - July 16

Youth Council Concert - July 17

Roller Rebels Tryouts - July 19


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com