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Letter: Treading Water: Pros And Cons Of Fracking

I read with interest about the panel discussion on the pros and cons of so-called “hydrofracking.” The debate as framed makes good points, however, it also misses a few key points.

When I was an exploration and development geologist for a Fortune 100 oil and gas company, for all the majors I worked with the preferred industry standard practice for both oil and gas well completions was called an “acid frac,” or an “acid job.” Based on my understanding, this is still the preferred method for non-horizontal wells, not hydrofracking.

The acids pumped into these wells, such as hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acid, are highly concentrated to “clean out” or dissolve rock and natural cements to produce preferential flow paths for oil and gas. These old practices involve hundreds of thousands of U.S. wells—more than are typically hydrofracked. These practices are unregulated, as are the drilling muds.

“Mud” is a misleading term. These muds are laden with polymers, chemicals, and heavy metals formulated to bring to the surface crushed rock, coat the borehole, and prevent blowouts. My company experienced a “blowout” in Oklahoma that blew the entire drill string out of the hole when it encountered an over-pressured gas zone and the mud was not thick enough to counter the massive pressure. Muds are excluded from reporting, regulation or oversight.

The key to a successful well is the completion method: the type of mud used and how the well casing is cemented into place. The blow-out of BP’s Deep Water Horizon Anaconda well in the Gulf is a recent case of questionable cementing practices. There was also a major blowout several years prior in Ohio.

Well-drilling and completions are not regulated, left up to what is termed “best professional practice.” Yet large areas and groundwater zones in many old producing areas in the U.S. are contaminated from prior practices. This calls for a broad-based effort by citizens and government to reduce deaths and injuries. Despite best practices, accidents do happen.

Stephen Cipot

News

The Farmingdale Baseball League recently capped off its fourth annual 9/11 baseball tournament with a series of championship games, to ultimately determine which Long Island town reigns supreme. On Aug. 16, teams from 8U to 14U fought tooth and nail for the ultimate prize.

 

One of the most exciting games was the 12U championship between the Long Island Devils and hometown Farmingdale Greendogs. Farmingdale started off the tournament path by going 6-0 in group play as the Devils went 3-3. In the playoff portion of the tournament, the Greendogs shellacked the Ozone Howard Renegades 11-3, on Aug. 14, while the Devils staved off East Meadow from getting on the scoreboard, beating them 5-0.

Four years after the Hempstead Town Board of Appeals denied a proposal to construct six T-Mobile transmitters on the roof of the Farmingdale-Wantagh Jewish Center along Woodbine Avenue, a federal district court decision, on July 22, dismissed the case.

 

“The court’s decision to dismiss this case signifies another crucial victory for Hempstead Town and Wantagh neighbors,” said Town Supervisor Kate Murray. “The proposal never conformed to the character of this cherished suburban community, and we’re thrilled that our preservation efforts have been rewarded.”


Sports

Lacrosse teams from across the region are invited to a major fall tournament sponsored by the 2014 Nassau County Champions, Farmingdale’s Lady Dalers.

 

The event, scheduled for September 28 at Farmingdale High School, is open to any and all teams ranging from grades 5 through 12. The all-day event runs from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.

 

All levels will play 7-v-7 plus a goalie in the tournament’s format. The team fee is $575.00 per team, with an unlimited roster.  

Throughout the summer, the Farmingdale Observer will feature the box scores from the Farmingdale Baseball League Inc.’s 9/11 Baseball Tournament. 

August 1

Island Trees 16 - East Meadow Blue 0 (9UB)

 

Farmingdale Greendogs 9 - LSW Red 4 (12U)


Calendar

DJ Dancetime - August 14

High School Reunion - August 15

Kayak the Nissequogue River - August 16


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com