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Science Whiz Kids Strut Their Stuff

Everyone knows that the Dalers can deliver the goods when it comes to nearly any sport, but word has spread that there is yet another field where the students of Farmingdale High School are delivering hard-hitting results: the field of science.

Science Research Advisor Laurie Sheinwald said the school’s Science Research Club was started in response to Farmingdale’s public reputation solely as a school for athletics. She said that they wanted to show that they have an impressive scientific community of students as well.

“We’ve always had a small, strong science core,” Sheinwald said. “But more and more, we’ve been getting involved in the science competitions and fairs, and Farmingdale is finally being recognized for what we have here.”

According to Sheinwald. the school’s annual Science Symposium, was the district’s way of allowing the Research Club members a chance to strut their stuff for the public after a year’s worth of hard work and research.

“We’ve been holding the Symposium for the past 15 years now,” she said. “It showcases all the student’s projects...some of the Research Club students just work within the high school doing their experiments, and others will do them on their own, while others are accepted into very special, competitive programs outside of the school, where they do fantastic, award-winning work.”

The Science Symposium, held in the high school’s common area, featured the members of the Research Club each show displays containing information on their varied and complex experiments and the results. In addition, several seniors held detailed presentations in the library on some of their projects as well.

During the event, Farmingdale High School senior and Class of 2014 Valedictorian Elijah Mas presented his findings in his project entitled “air and sound, density’s effect on soundwave propagation.”

He said that while he has been studying astrophysics during his time in the Research Club, his presentation was an unofficial experiment that he simply conducted in his own home.

“I’ve been playing guitar since 2009, and I wanted to deal with everyday things and the changes in how they sound when exposed to temperature and humidity variations, so I set this experiment to something that I love to do, which is music,” he said. “My father and I bounced some ideas off of one another, and started it towards the end of winter, and we conducted a lot of trials. There wasn’t a significant trend that we showed, but that’s okay. An experiment is still perfectly valid if you’re thorough with your methods.”

Mas said that the message that he wanted to impart upon the younger members of the Research Club is that science can be accessible to anyone, as long as they go into it with the right mindset.

“A lot of these kids are still undecided about what they want to do. Science is interesting to them, but perhaps they’re not as overly passionate about it,” Mas said. “It’s nice to show them that not everything has to be this huge deal. That you can do a simple, down-to-Earth experiment in the comforts of what you see every day.”

The future is already looking bright for Mas; he’s set to begin his studies in astrophysics at Yale University come the fall.

Farmingdale junior Michael Callahan is a young up-and-coming scientific hopeful. His project, entitled “specifying the apterous protein-coding mutation in Drosophila Melanogaster,” involved the study of genetically altered flightless fruit flies.

“The provider that sells fruit flies to the school offers various types, including flightless mutations,” Callahan said. “I was wondering what they do to make those flies flightless, so this experiment just set out to verify the location of where they made that mutation that caused the flies to have defective flight capabilities.”

Katherine Vera was able to participate in the prestigious Cold Spring Harbor Partner for the Future program with her presentation, titled “cell-to-cell trafficking: plasmodesmata-located proteins may influence phenotype in Arabidopsis, dealt with some of the biological processes of life itself.

“I started with the Science Research Club in the ninth grade, and it’s basically allowed me to look into science outside of the classroom... in the real world,” she said. “It’s allowed me to pursue biology in a different perspective, and I was really able to fall in love with it, mostly because it allows me to answer questions that I’m interested in asking and finding the answer to.”

Vera will be attending Stamform University in the fall, where she will be studying bio-engineering while on a pre-Med track.

Sheinwald said that the Science Research Club is opening a lot of eyes on campus; it’s showing students that there’s more than one way to achieve your dreams and goals.

“More and more kids are saying, ‘wow, I don’t have to play a sport.

I can be a superstar if I learn science.’ And that’s so important,” Sheinwald said.

News

This month, the Professional Golfers Association of America [PGA] hosted the Barclays Tournament—part of the first round of PGA’s FedEx Tournament with a $1 million prize—at the Bethpage Black Golf Course. From the event, the PGA released $50,000 to the Village of Farmingdale. 

 

“It was great working with the Farmingdale community, one of the best host communities in the country”, said Peter Mele, PGA Tour Director.

Starting July 26, the St. Kilian Roman Catholic Church in Farmingdale will feature a production of the hit musical, The Wizard of Oz. 

 

Based on a classic tale—first penned as a children’s novel by L. Frank Baum in 1900 and later transformed into a major motion picture by Metro-Goldwyn Meyer in 1939— The Wizard of Oz tells the story of a girl named Dorothy Gale, played by Zoe Neyer, and her dog Toto, who after being thrown into a twister end up in the Land of Oz. 

 

Trying to find her way home, Dorothy meets Glinda the Good Witch of the North, played by Angela Roedig, who instructs her to “follow the Yellow Brick Road.”


Sports

Throughout the summer, the Farmingdale Observer will feature the box scores from the Farmingdale Baseball League Inc.’s 9/11 Baseball Tournament. 

July 13

Plainedge 12 - Island Trees 2 (9UB)

 

Ozone Howard Huskies 14 - Wantagh Hawks 1 (9UA)

The Farmingale Devils Travel Baseball teams were in action during The 4th of July weekend and provided fireworks in two different states.

 

The 11U Devils won their third tournament this year. They traveled  to Connecticut for the fourth of July tournament. The Devils lost game one on Saturday 7-5 to the Connecticut Defenders and won game two 17-0,The Devils advanced to the playoff round and would meet the Defenders again .The bats were on fire all day led by Big Joe Mcgrath and Nick Franco.The Devils beat the Defenders 11-5 and advanced to the championship to play the number one seed and undefeated Hit Club. The Devils jumped out to 4-2 to lead .The game was tied at 9-9 going to the 6th inning and the Devils would score 2 runs and hold on to win the tournament. The Devils had 52 hits and scored 44 runs,Big Joe had 4 doubles a triple, Nick Franco had 8 hits. Anthony Quatromani 8hits.Matt DiSanti drove in the last run in the championship game. Tim Dorman 6 hits. Patrick Quinn 5 hits and 6 stolen bases. Nick O'Connor 3 hits and 4 stolen bases. Kyle Gaertner 6 hits and was winner pitcher in championship game. Patrick Sanchez was the winning pitcher in semi-final game.


Calendar

Monty Python - July 23

After Hours Networking - July 24

Music Under The Stars - July 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com