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Waldbaums ‘Superfund’ Site

Ask pretty much anyone in the Farmingdale community about the biggest eyesore in the area, and most likely, they will reply with a single, solitary word: Waldbaums. 

 

The spot those residents would be referring to, of course, is the former Waldbaums Shopping center located on Main Street. With its boarded-up windows and gutted storefronts, the strip mall—currently without an owner and completely vacant for some time, except for a Chinese take-out restaurant that is currently squatting—has many locals crying foul over its dilapidated appearance. However, the real issue lies, not in what people can see, but what they cannot. 

 

Among the stores that had previously called the Waldbaums Shopping Center home, the Farmingdale Plaza Cleaners, unfortunately left its mark on the community in the form of an underground toxic plume containing tetrachloroethene, or PCE, which is a colorless liquid used in dry cleaning. Although the establishment has been gone for some time now, as a result of the inaction by the dry cleaner's former owners to do anything about the ground contamination, the Walbaums Shopping Center has been classified as a

"Superfund" site and is now under the jurisdiction of a United States federal law designed to clean up sites contaminated with hazardous substances using governement funds. 

 

On March 11, the Village of Farmingdale held a public hearing with the New York State Department of Environmental Conversation to present a proposed plan to clean-up the Waldbaums site. According to Bill Fonda, a citizen participation specialist with the state

DEC, public opinion on the proposed clean-up plan is encouraged and will be taken into consideration until March 24, meanwhile the DEC will make its final decision before April 1. 

 

“If approved, we will contact contractors and consultants to evaluate the site and design a plan,” Fonda said. “That process usually takes up to a year to complete, at which time we will break ground and begin to pump out the contaminants.”

 

NYSDEC’s Chek Beng Ng gave an overview of the history of Farmingdale Plaza Cleaners at the Waldbaums site, which opened its doors once the shopping center was constructed in 1983, and when United States Environmental Protection Agency testing was

conducted in 2000 it was discovered that there was a significant amount of tetrachloroethene in the soil and groundwater in the area, and that the dry cleaners was the likely source, Ng said, although the pollution was most probably inadvertent and unintentional.

 

“In 2002, the site was listed as a Class 2 site on the New York State DEC Registry of Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites,” he said. “In 2005, the potentially responsible parties failed to sign an Order of Consent and the site was referred to the State Superfund for Remedial Investigation.”

 

Ng pointed out that the contamination in the area is in no way affecting the drinking water of Farmingdale residents; the trajectory of the toxic plume does not place it near any drinking water wells, he said. 

 

Bridget Callaghan Boyd, of the New York State Department of Health, held a brief presentation at the meeting that concurred with Ng’s safety estimation.

 

“Contact with contaminated soil or groundwater is not likely,” she said. “The contamination is located at a depth below concrete or building foundations, and the area is served by public water that originated away from the site.” 

 

However, the plume continues to slowly spread, and to do something about it once and for all, Ng unveiled several potential strategies that the NYSDEC has considered, and the one that they had finally decided on to combat it. 

 

“The remedial alternative we are proposing is modified pump and treat with long-term monitoring, which will cost approximately $1,631,000,” he said. “We will design and install a groundwater extraction system, place extraction wells at the leading edge of the

highest PCE concentration, treat the extracted water with granular-activated carbon filters, and monitor the area for five years afterward.”

 

In the meantime, since any entity that purchases the property will be forced to take on a portion of the cost of cleaning up the groundwater contamination, it is likely that the Waldbaums Shopping Center will remain vacant until such time as the clean-up is completed; the exact timetable for that, according to NYSDEC representatives at the meeting, is uncertain until they actually break ground and see first-hand what they’re dealing with.

 

Anyone wishing to weigh-in on the NYSDEC’s proposed plan to clean-up the Farmingdale Waldbaums site contamination, can email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

News

There was a time when people knew what they were eating. Frozen meals, fast food chains and ingredients impossible to pronounce were non-existent. Instead, simple ingredients and meals were all made from scratch.

Joann P. Magri, owner of The Divine Olive, is keeping this way of eating alive. Offering hungry customers with a choice in quality foods and ingredients, Magri encourages customers to make their own meals. With shelves stocked full of 18-year-old vinegars straight from Modena, Italy, to extra virgin olive oils infused with various herbs and flavors, the Divine Olive features a variety of organic and vegan products, all 100 percent natural. It even has handmade spaghetti and fresh bread, which perfectly pairs with all of their other products.

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of LI designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

It will be difficult to top the exhilaration of being crowned Nassau County Champs, but the 2014 Farmingdale Dalers will begin their defense of the title on Sept. 13 at rival Massapequa—whom they beat to claim the crown.

“The attitude is that we have to prove it again,” said Head Coach Buddy Krumenacker, who has been at the helm since 1993. “But I think we’ll be okay,” he added.

Register now as classes fill up quickly and you don’t want to miss out on the chance to join in trapeze workshops at Eisenhower Park’s I.FLY this fall.

 

“I.FLY was designed to give kids and adults the ability to fulfill their dreams of being in the circus,” says instructor Anthony Rosamilia.  “Flying through the air never gets boring.  At I.FLY, we help people create lifelong memories.” 


Calendar

Board of Education Special Meeting

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Movies on the Green: The Nut Job

Thursday, Aug. 28

Warbirds Legends Weekend

Friday, Aug. 29



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com