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Farmingdale Honors Year Of The Horse

Farmingdale’s Breakfast Rotary Club welcomed the Year Of The Horse to town with a celebration at The Lotus Garden Restaurant on Sunday, Feb. 9, which the club holds annually to raise money for its endeavors through the year.

 

“The Chinese put a lot of emphasis on the new year,” said Ying Xing, reference librarian of the Farmingdale Public Library, who was on-hand to explain the meaning and customs of Chinese New Year. “It is important and everyone is expected on Chinese New Year to come home.” 

 

Xing also brought authentic Chinese props, like firecrackers and lanterns, to show off to the crowd and explained their importance as well as their usage in the celebration.  

 

With a ticket price of $45, attendees were treated to a full meal of Chinese fare, a traditional Chinese Dragon Line Dance, a tutorial about Chinese New Year and a Chinese auction, explained Brendan Mahoney, president of the Farmingdale Breakfast Rotary Club. 

 

“We are always looking for ways to raise money and this is something fun and really different from the rest of our fundraisers,” Mahoney said. “We’ve been doing this for the past few years and it’s just an exciting, different way to help raise funds to carry out of mission in the Farmingdale community. My favorite part about this whole thing is the multi-cultural aspect. It’s a new experience for a lot of people here in Farmingdale that don’t always get to see this kind of thing. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never seen a traditional Dragon Dance before.”

 

Mahoney told Farmingdale Observer that Carol Ross, another member of the rotary club, is the chief organizer for the event and spends a lot of time with the restaurant to ensure a great night. He said that she also coordinates with Xing and the Chinese Cultural

Center of Long Island for the presentations and Dragon Dance, respectively, as well as works with local business to gather donations and put together gifts for the Chinese Auction.  “She organizes this whole thing every year and really does a great, great job. It takes a lot of effort to coordinate everything and to make all the baskets for the auction and set everything up,” Mahoney said. 

 

A successful event, Mahoney said that the most important thing is that the money raised by the group goes right back into the community. “Every penny raised is used to fund things right here in town,” Mahoney said. He explained that the money will go towards scholarships that are given to seniors at Farmingdale High School upon graduation, food drives and to help families in need with things like school supplies and other expenses. “I think its incumbent upon each and every citizen to give back to their community. We are all blessed to be here, to be in America, to be on Long Island,” he said. 


News

Oyster Bay Town officials are mulling an override of the state’s 2 percent property tax cap for the second consecutive fiscal year. On Aug. 12, the town held a hearing to approve local legislation, giving the Town Council authority to pierce the cap.

 

However, according to Marta Kane, a spokesperson with the Town of Oyster Bay, Supervisor John Venditto and the members of the Oyster Bay Town Council are not certain if they will entertain a repeat of last year, when the board adopted a $277 million budget, increasing the tax levy by $15,964,647—or 8.8 percent. 

Village officials have teamed up with James Faith Entertainment—founders of the Great South Bay Music Festival in Patchogue—to organize Farmingdale’s first ever two-day music festival, this September 13 and 14. 

 

“Farmingdale is another town that is starting to move forward,” festival producer Jim Faith told the Farmingdale Observer, last May. “[The inaugural festival] will be small, but we’ll start growing it... music festival always take a few years to catch on.” 

 

Faith said that when he first started the Great South Bay Music Festival, back in 2007, it too started small, growing little by little each year. For its inaugural year, Faith booked folk musician Richie

Havens to headline the event. Now, more than eight years later, the festival has featured numerous big name musicians, including: the Doobie Brothers, WAR, Billy Squier, Taking Back Sunday, moe., and Blues legend B.B. King, to name a few. 


Sports

Register now as classes fill up quickly and you don’t want to miss out on the chance to join in trapeze workshops at Eisenhower Park’s I.FLY this fall.

 

“I.FLY was designed to give kids and adults the ability to fulfill their dreams of being in the circus,” says instructor Anthony Rosamilia.  “Flying through the air never gets boring.  At I.FLY, we help people create lifelong memories.” 

After more than a month of group play, on Aug. 16, fourteen teams went head-to-head for a shot at the 2014 Farmingdale Baseball League’s 9/11 Tournament Championship. Here are some highlights from Saturday’s championships. 

 

8U Finals

Long Island Rangers 8 - Farmingdale Greendogs 9


Calendar

McKevitt Mobile Office Hours - August 21

Artisan Market - August 23

Blood Drive - August 24


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com