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Bethpage Water District Drills New Well

In an effort to continue to provide Bethpage Water District customers with safe drinking water, the district is drilling a new well in the Bethpage State Park, outside of the Bethpage Plume.

The well, located at South Park Drive, in the planning since 2005 and under construction since July 2013, will be the District’s ninth well. It is expected to pump up to nearly three million gallons of water per day to the Bethpage Water District’s 33,000 customers. Established in 1923, the Bethpage Water District serves an area of five square miles, including portions of Plainview and Old Bethpage, north of Haypath Road and east of the Seaford Oyster Bay Expressway. It is anticipated that this will be completed and operational by the summer of 2014.

The problems with the groundwater in the Bethpage area are not new. The Grumman Corporation occupied approximately 635 acres in the Bethpage Water District beginning in the early 1930s. For decades, this site was used for manufacturing, and in the 1970s, the water supply wells used by Grumman became contaminated.  

In the 1970s and 1980s, pollution of the groundwater generated by Northrop Grumman was confined to the company’s site. However, in the decades since then, this has changed dramatically and the toxic groundwater plume is significantly larger than the community was led to believe.

At present, the contamination of groundwater has dramatically migrated from the Northrop Grumman site to pollute other wells.  There is evidence that three well sites in Bethpage have been affected and the toxicity of the groundwater is a major concern. The Water District has installed advanced treatment systems at the three well sites to remove all plume contaminants from the groundwater before it becomes drinking water and is delivered to the community. In addition to affecting the Bethpage district and the residents of the community, this problem is currently impacting a South Farmingdale well site as well as a well site of Long Island American Water and is extremely close to beginning to impact water in Massapequa, south of the Southern State Parkway.

Approximately two years ago, the Bethpage Water District leased a four-acre piece of property in the Bethpage State Park for a 99-year term from New York State as part of its strategic plan to provide drinking water as cost effectively as possible and develop new sources outside the plume left by Grumman. This new well is almost two miles from the district’s other eight wells. While the Navy has worked with the water district in addressing its needs, Grumman has not and is doing little to accept responsibility and remediate the plume.

To date, the Bethpage Water District has spent more than $20 million to provide clean drinking water originating from contaminated groundwater under manufacturing sites previously occupied by Northrop Grumman and the United States Navy. The agency has opted to open up this new well as a cost effective alternative to using the more costly advanced treatment systems to produce clean water from existing wells.

“Ensuring water quality and public health is of course our number one priority, but the number two priority is doing so in the most cost effective way possible,” said Bethpage Water District Commissioner John R. Sullivan.

The funding for the South Park Drive well project, an approximately $4 million expense, has become the responsibility of the residents of the Bethpage Water District, which has floated a 20-year bond from the Town of Oyster Bay to fund this work.

Rather than continuing to purify the water from existing wells, the district has decided it would be more cost effective in the long term to create new sources of water outside of the plume, including the new well under construction at the Bethpage State Park. At present, there are eight production wells throughout the district and there is evidence of groundwater contamination from the Grumman plume at the source of five of them.  

The water district plans to shut down some of the existing wells, or turn them over to the Navy or Grumman to remediate once these new sources are operational. Bethpage Water Commissioner, Gary S. Bretton added, “For years, we have been forced to spend additional money purifying ground water from existing sources. This new well will allow us to provide water to the community without the need for advanced treatment and guarantee Bethpage’s water safety going into the future.”

Bethpage Water District Superintendent, Mike Boufis, commented that the structure to be built on the site of the new well in late 2013 to early 2014 will blend into the ambience of the Trail View State Park. He described this six-month construction project as a “low profile ski chalet type of solar unit that will be environmentally sensitive and result in a low impact on the newly constructed bike path extension and multi-use trails.” He assured residents that the drinking water in the Bethpage Water District is “absolutely safe to drink and is completely free of any contaminants found in the groundwater affected by the Grumman plume.”

News

There was a time when people knew what they were eating. Frozen meals, fast food chains and ingredients impossible to pronounce were non-existent. Instead, simple ingredients and meals were all made from scratch.

Joann P. Magri, owner of The Divine Olive, is keeping this way of eating alive. Offering hungry customers with a choice in quality foods and ingredients, Magri encourages customers to make their own meals. With shelves stocked full of 18-year-old vinegars straight from Modena, Italy, to extra virgin olive oils infused with various herbs and flavors, the Divine Olive features a variety of organic and vegan products, all 100 percent natural. It even has handmade spaghetti and fresh bread, which perfectly pairs with all of their other products.

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of LI designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

It will be difficult to top the exhilaration of being crowned Nassau County Champs, but the 2014 Farmingdale Dalers will begin their defense of the title on Sept. 13 at rival Massapequa—whom they beat to claim the crown.

“The attitude is that we have to prove it again,” said Head Coach Buddy Krumenacker, who has been at the helm since 1993. “But I think we’ll be okay,” he added.

Register now as classes fill up quickly and you don’t want to miss out on the chance to join in trapeze workshops at Eisenhower Park’s I.FLY this fall.

 

“I.FLY was designed to give kids and adults the ability to fulfill their dreams of being in the circus,” says instructor Anthony Rosamilia.  “Flying through the air never gets boring.  At I.FLY, we help people create lifelong memories.” 


Calendar

Board of Education Special Meeting

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Movies on the Green: The Nut Job

Thursday, Aug. 28

Warbirds Legends Weekend

Friday, Aug. 29



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com