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Celebrating July Fourth In 1863

Hundreds of residents from Farmingdale and other neighboring towns celebrated the Fourth of July as if the clock was turned back to 1863 at the Old Bethpage Restoration Independence Day celebration.  

With actors dressed in 1800s attire and everyone getting into the historical spirit, activities included a demonstration of  ‘old time baseball’ – a game played by the rules of 1864; a demonstration of military drills and firing rounds by the 119th Regiment NY Volunteers Co. H Historical Society, a parade through the restoration village leading up to the Noon Inn and various other activities taking place throughout their numerous historically preserved houses.  

“It’s a terrific way to celebrate our nation’s birthday,” one Plainview resident and mother of two children said, who were outside the Bach Blacksmith Shop.  “The kids can learn something and have fun at the same time.”

Families could be seen throughout the village, enduring the hot and humid weather with pride as they walked from location to location, absorbing the knowledge and historical flare of the restoration.

The Blacksmith Shop, which educated spectators about the craft back in the 1800s, was one of the many event-long attractions, including candle making at the Ritch House, Leatherwork at the Luyster General Store, storytelling near the schoolhouse and fiddle and dulcimer music in the Luyster Field.  Singing at the Manetto Hill Church and Pottery at the Schenck Barn were also favorites throughout the day.

The 119th Regiment NY Volunteers Co. H Historical Society drew the largest crowd of the day – members of the regiment were originally recruited on Long Island during the Civil War. Based out of the restoration, the unit’s C.O. (Commanding Officer) is Robert Webber of Farmingdale, who explained to the crowd about how the militia would load their Enfeild 577 Caliber Muskets, which were reproductions.

“Today’s turnout was great, it’s always a benefit when you can teach people something in this kind of way,” Webber said.

As the regiment fired away outside the Noon Inn under the American flag, onlookers held their ears and jumped slightly at the powerful explosions, giving everyone a taste of what was heard loud and clear in Civil War battles.

Members of the regiment hail from towns across Nassau County as well as Queens.

The Noon Inn remained the center of attention for most of the day, as well as the John M. Layton Grocery and General Store.  The Inn is restored to 1850, and was originally located on Prospect Avenue in East Meadow.

The day concluded with a parade from the Powell House to the Noon Inn featuring the Old Bethpage Village Brass Band, where a gathering of nearly everyone attending sung The Star-Spangled Banner and listened to duettists’ The Sisters of Liberty, as well as sermons and readings in 1800s fashion to celebrate Independence Day.

News

There was a time when people knew what they were eating. Frozen meals, fast food chains and ingredients impossible to pronounce were non-existent. Instead, simple ingredients and meals were all made from scratch.

Joann P. Magri, owner of The Divine Olive, is keeping this way of eating alive. Offering hungry customers with a choice in quality foods and ingredients, Magri encourages customers to make their own meals. With shelves stocked full of 18-year-old vinegars straight from Modena, Italy, to extra virgin olive oils infused with various herbs and flavors, the Divine Olive features a variety of organic and vegan products, all 100 percent natural. It even has handmade spaghetti and fresh bread, which perfectly pairs with all of their other products.

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of LI designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

It will be difficult to top the exhilaration of being crowned Nassau County Champs, but the 2014 Farmingdale Dalers will begin their defense of the title on Sept. 13 at rival Massapequa—whom they beat to claim the crown.

“The attitude is that we have to prove it again,” said Head Coach Buddy Krumenacker, who has been at the helm since 1993. “But I think we’ll be okay,” he added.

Register now as classes fill up quickly and you don’t want to miss out on the chance to join in trapeze workshops at Eisenhower Park’s I.FLY this fall.

 

“I.FLY was designed to give kids and adults the ability to fulfill their dreams of being in the circus,” says instructor Anthony Rosamilia.  “Flying through the air never gets boring.  At I.FLY, we help people create lifelong memories.” 


Calendar

Board of Education Special Meeting

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Movies on the Green: The Nut Job

Thursday, Aug. 28

Warbirds Legends Weekend

Friday, Aug. 29



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com