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‘Wine U Design’ Getting Better With Age

From crushing grapes to bottling, patrons are promised the best in ‘fermentertainment’

Normally, Long Islanders pack up their cars and head eastbound on the LIE for a winemaking or tasting experience, but Wine U Design gives aspiring local sommeliers the freedom to create and bottle personalized wines right here in Hicksville. 

The winery opened its doors at 156 Engineers Drive three years ago when co-owners Vincenzo Saulle and Gianni Fabrizi envisioned bringing several generations worth of family tradition to the contemporary corporate world.

“Gianni and I, this is the kind of thing that we would do as kids. Our fathers and grandfathers got us involved in the winemaking process. As the world is getting busier, especially in these parts, these traditions are dying out. We find a lot of people are doing home winemaking kits and the quality is poor, so we kind of wanted to bring this tradition back to the market place,” said Saulle.

The building’s industrial façade is far removed from the vast green acreage of Suffolk County’s renowned vineyards, but once inside, the sounds of jazz and aroma of uncorked spirits dismiss any notion that good wine can’t be made – and enjoyed – close to home. 

In the early evening hours on Sept. 13, patrons poured in to the Wine U Design winery to complete the final phase (bottling) of the personalized winemaking process, one that began nearly one year ago with the grape selection and a hands-on crash course in crushing. 

“They come into our place, ask us about different varietals and what we think might work for them or their group and we order them grapes based on what their taste profile is. Then they come in and it’s time to get dirty,” Saulle explained.

One week after crushing, winemakers came back to press the “must” (the grapes’ new state following crushing and fermenting) in order to squeeze and funnel the liquid into barrels, where the aging process begins. Throughout the next several months, the wine matures and stabilizes during the “rack” phase, during which the barrels are eventually emptied, cleaned and then refilled.

“There is nobody else doing it on Long Island. What we provide is a place where state of the art equipment and the best grapes we can get our hands on are waiting for the customer that wants to make high quality wine,” said Saulle.

The wine is also tested throughout the phases – and before the final phase, where bottles are filled, corked and sealed, winemakers are provided the materials to design their labels.

Patrons can take home to up 240 bottles of their own vintage or as little as one case. Specialty barrels are also available, as is the Wine U Design venue for everything from birthday to engagement parties. 

“They learn about what they’re doing; they learn about fermentation and they learn about the process. At the end, it’s a yearlong term after aging and all that. When they do give that bottle to somebody, there’s a sense of pride and a smile on their face because they can actually say, ‘I made this,’” Saulle said.

For more information, call (516) 939-9463, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or find Wine U Design on Facebook.

News

There was a time when people knew what they were eating. Frozen meals, fast food chains and ingredients impossible to pronounce were non-existent. Instead, simple ingredients and meals were all made from scratch.

Joann P. Magri, owner of The Divine Olive, is keeping this way of eating alive. Offering hungry customers with a choice in quality foods and ingredients, Magri encourages customers to make their own meals. With shelves stocked full of 18-year-old vinegars straight from Modena, Italy, to extra virgin olive oils infused with various herbs and flavors, the Divine Olive features a variety of organic and vegan products, all 100 percent natural. It even has handmade spaghetti and fresh bread, which perfectly pairs with all of their other products.

It’s a cute little ‘bug.’ What it represents, however, is anything but cute.

An unusual-looking Volkswagen is toodling around Long Island this month. Painted to resemble the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), the VW Beetle is part of efforts by the US Department of Agriculture to eliminate the pest, which can destroy 70 percent of an area’s tree canopy, according to the agency. Initially, officials held hope for complete eradication from about 23 square miles of LI designated as infested or at risk by 2016. Instead, this “landcape-altering pest” is spreading.


Sports

It will be difficult to top the exhilaration of being crowned Nassau County Champs, but the 2014 Farmingdale Dalers will begin their defense of the title on Sept. 13 at rival Massapequa—whom they beat to claim the crown.

“The attitude is that we have to prove it again,” said Head Coach Buddy Krumenacker, who has been at the helm since 1993. “But I think we’ll be okay,” he added.

Register now as classes fill up quickly and you don’t want to miss out on the chance to join in trapeze workshops at Eisenhower Park’s I.FLY this fall.

 

“I.FLY was designed to give kids and adults the ability to fulfill their dreams of being in the circus,” says instructor Anthony Rosamilia.  “Flying through the air never gets boring.  At I.FLY, we help people create lifelong memories.” 


Calendar

Board of Education Special Meeting

Wednesday, Aug. 27

Movies on the Green: The Nut Job

Thursday, Aug. 28

Warbirds Legends Weekend

Friday, Aug. 29



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com