Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.

Justin Abrams To Climb Mount Kilimanjaro For Autism

Island Rock will host ‘Climb for a Cause’ for Spectrum Designs May 19

When Justin Abrams first visited Island Rock Indoor Rock Climbing in Plainview, it looked like his introduction to the sport was going to have to wait; it was 9 p.m., and the place was shut down tight. However, the 7-year-old from Dix Hills wasn’t in the mood to take no for an answer. He wanted to climb, and he wanted to climb now.

“As a little kid does, I ran up to the front door and started banging on the door, and the manager actually came out and saw that I was…literally in my pajamas,” remembered Abrams. Impressed by such enthusiasm, the manager put the pajama-clad Abrams in a harness and let the child climb, free of charge, all over the rock walls in the empty gym late into the night.

Now, 16 years later, Abrams is still climbing. In fact, he has set his sights on ascending one of the world’s most impressive peaks, Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, the tallest mountain in Africa and the largest free-standing mountain in the world. Presumably, he won’t be in his pajamas, but he will be raising money for Spectrum Design, a nonprofit enterprise located in Port Washington that employs people with autistic spectrum disorders to create custom-made decorated T-shirts and apparel.

For Abrams, who works in financial services when he’s not hitting the rocks, climbing is the ultimate sport. In addition to providing a challenging workout for the body and an engaging puzzle for the mind, it lends a satisfying sense of reality to the often metaphorical struggle to make it to the top: when Abrams stands at the top of a mountain, the feeling of achievement cannot be denied.

“The pain in your fingertips, the lactic buildup of every muscle in your body, and to accomplish something that is just the culmination of getting to the top…,” Abrams mused about his passion. “For me, it’s just the No. 1 sport I participate in.” Which is saying something for this athletic 23-year-old, since he also engages in whitewater canoeing, mountain biking and snowboarding.

Abrams was alerted to the possibility of climbing Kilimanjaro more or less by accident. Earlier this year, he was browsing an entertainment website when he came across an interesting headline: “High Resolution Atop Mount Kilimanjaro.” “My heart pounded, my eyes widened, the opportunity to continue onward and upward in pursuit of my passion was right there, one click away,” he said.

However, Abrams wanted to make his climb a memorable event for more than just one person. He soon started thinking about Spectrum Designs, a sub-organization of the Nicholas Center for Autism co-founded by one of his friends, Patrick Bardsley. In very little time, Abrams and a team at Spectrum had organized “Spectrum Climbs Kilimanjaro,” a fundraiser that has already raised $18,000 for the Spectrum Designs Foundation.

With approximately 1 in 88 children diagnosed with disorders on the autism spectrum, Abrams feels that autism is an issue that touches everyone. While no one in his immediate family is autistic, there are children with the disorder among his cousins and extended family.

“Autism effects everyone, in some way, shape or form,” said Abrams. “It really is just a very prevalent disorder in the community.” He hopes his Kilimanjaro trek will not only raise funds that will allow Spectrum to keep providing employment and valuable experience to autistic individuals, but will also raise awareness of the challenges faced by those with autism in general.

However, even for a consummate outdoorsman like Abrams, Kilimanjaro is no casual hike. Despite being one of the world’s most accessible high summits, requiring little equipment to climb successfully, the peak is still 19,336 feet above sea level. A journey that starts out in the forests of Northern Tanzania, near the town of Moshi, becomes increasingly desolate as the vegetation disappears. By the last leg of the climb, the African climate has given way to a world of ice and snow. Among other problems, many climbers succumb to altitude sickness when they try to ascend too quickly.

“It’s what’s called a non-technical climb. It’s definitely very, very difficult, but people really do underestimate it,” said Abrams, acknowledging the common problem with altitude sickness. However, the climber says he isn’t concerned about this particular risk. “It definitely does happen, but for me personally I have a lot of experience and a lot of control.”

In order to make sure he’s prepared for the climb, Abrams has started an aggressive training regiment, including lots of cardio exercise. He also climbs in the Adirondacks in upstate New York nearly every weekend. Perhaps most importantly, he spends time several days a week in a high-altitude simulation training compression chamber, courtesy of Hypoxico, a company that specializes in simulating high-altitude conditions for athletic training. The chamber provides oxygen-reduced air, allowing Abrams’ body to adjust to high-altitude conditions before he even boards the plane to Tanzania.

As Abrams prepares for his trip to Africa, which begins May 26, those interested in contributing to the project will have the opportunity to do so. “Climb For A Cause” on May 19 at Island Rock at 60 Skyline Drive in Plainview will feature a meet-and-greet with Abrams, (optional) climbing for anyone over the age of 6, refreshments and giveaways. The suggested donation is $25, and all funds will go to the Spectrum Designs Foundation. The event will run from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information about these fundraisers, or to donate to Spectrum Climbs Kilimanjaro, visit http://spectrumclimbs.eventbrite.com/.

Furthermore, everyone is encouraged to help spread the word. “Even if you’re not in a position to donate, it’s totally understandable, but if you could just spread the word among your local community, family and friends,” said Abrams. Easy enough to do: “Did you hear about the guy who’s climbing Kilimanjaro?” makes for a good conversation starter.

News

At a recent meeting of the Farmingdale Board of Education, school district superintendent John Lorentz discussed New York State’s proposal to invest $2 billion into districts statewide

through the Smart Schools Bond Act.

 

If approved by voters in the upcoming general elections, the act would allow the state to borrow $2 billion in the form of a capital bond to provide students with access to classroom

technology and high-speed internet connectivity, with the goal of equalizing opportunities for children to learn, adding classroom space, expanding pre-kindergarten programs, replacing classroom trailers with permanent instructional space and installing high-tech security features in schools. 

Over the weekend, thousands of Long Island residents flocked to the Village of Farmingdale for its 26th annual Columbus Day Weekend Fair and Fireman’s carnival. Running from Oct. 9

to 13, the five-day affair featured live music from Farmingdale’s own Electric Dudes and Long Island party band Superbad, a Fire Department barbecue, food vendors, a street fair, fireworks, carnival rides, games for kids of all ages and, of course, the Columbus Day parade. 


Sports

Last week, officials with the St. Kilian Saints baseball team inducted John Lombardi and Aaron Powell into their Hall of Fame. 

 

—Submitted by Farmingdale PAL and St. Kilian Baseball 


The 2014 Reilly Cup finals featured the two most successful OTHG teams over the last 9 years. Sal’s Place and Singleton’s have had 11 finals appearances and 7 championships between them during this period of time. They split 2 games during the regular season and Singleton’s became the winner’s bracket representative in the 2014 Cup by beating Sal’s deep in the tournament.

 

Sal’s took the first game 14-7. The game was close until the 8th inning when Sal’s broke it open with some timely hits and taking advantage of a Singleton’s miscue or two.  Sal’s held

Singleton’s to 7 runs with outstanding all-around defense, which was particularly impressive given that some of their significant contributors were visibly fighting through late-season injuries. 


Calendar

Homecoming - October 24

Autumn Fair - October 25

St. Kilian Blood Drive - October 26


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com