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Bob McMillanAn Opinion

By Bob McMillan
Presidents v. The Supreme Court

The recent political chatter about “Obamacare” before the Supreme Court of the United States got a great deal of media attention.  President Obama added fuel to the fire when he declared, “Ultimately, I am confident the Supreme Court will not take what would be an unprecedented, extraordinary step of overturning a law that was passed by a strong majority of a democratically elected Congress.”

For someone who was a law professor those words were absurd.  Even if a bill passed unanimously in the house and senate, it could still be overturned – if the law was in violation of the Constitution.


Michael Miller

Viewpoint

By Michael Miller
1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing

Nelson Rockefeller’s nomination for Governor in 1958 was partly an upstate revolt against the continued domination of party affairs by the Nassau Republican organization. Rockefeller was a man who always had bigger fish to fry, and throughout his almost 15 years as governor, he often went out of his way not to step on the toes of the touchy Nassau GOP. That’s why Nassau is the only large New York county without a state office building. Respect the turf.

Just before taking office, Rockefeller announced that State Senator William Hults would be Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, but not until the end of the 1959 legislative session, so that Glen Cove, North Hempstead, Oyster Bay and a sliver of Hempstead wouldn’t lose their Senate representation until 1960.


Mike BarryEye on the Island

By Mike Barry
The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’

The Nassau County district attorney’s (DA) office makes a cameo appearance in Empty Mansions, an incredible book about Huguette Clark (1906-2011), the Manhattan-raised heiress whose generosity and eccentricities were legendary.

Now that Ryan Murphy, a creator of television’s “Glee,” has optioned Empty Mansions’ film rights, I imagine a scrum of top actresses are vying to play Clark.


Female Friendship

Comedian Chris Rock, in an HBO special which aired after 1999’s Columbine High School massacre, observed that the two murderers were supposedly depressed because they had only six friends. “I didn’t have six friends in high school,” Rock said. “I don’t have six friends now.”

Novelist Kristin Hannah has made a name for herself in the world of contemporary women’s fiction by exploring female friendship, with 2009’s Firefly Lane focusing on the lifelong bond between Kate Ryan and Tully Hart. Firefly Lane is the street where they grew up.

Hannah, who lives in the state of Washington, where many of her stories are set, is coming to Huntington next week as part of her book tour for Fly Away (St. Martin’s Press). It is the follow-up to her New York Times bestseller Firefly Lane. One critic compared Firefly Lane favorably to Iris Dart’s Beaches, a novel adapted into a film starring Bette Midler and Barbara Hershey.

Before coming to Long Island, Hannah will be in Manhattan on Tuesday, April 23, Fly Away’s official publication date, at the Barnes & Noble, 150 East 86th St., at 7 p.m. She will then travel on Thursday, April 25, to Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington, at 7 p.m. for a talk and book signing.

One of the theories I’ve developed about soap operas and cable TV networks that appeal to women, such as Lifetime, is that it is all about the bed: who’s in it, how did they get there, and is there someone lying next to them who you didn’t expect to see there. Hannah’s Fly Away has plenty of such moments, with one of the novel’s main characters ending up in a hospital bed because of an auto accident, and another landing in her godmother’s bed with a guy wearing more make-up than Johnny Depp in Edward Scissorhands.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Fly Away chronicles the epic aftermath of Kate’s death, and how it sends Tully into a personal and professional tailspin, and Marah, Kate’s daughter, into the arms of a mascara-wearing man. They met in a group grief counseling session, in case you were wondering how that happened.

Kate was married and had three children while Tully, the love of her life having wed another woman, became a nationally renowned television personality. Tully walked away from her popular TV program, The Girlfriend Hour, to care for the cancer-stricken Kate in the final months of Kate’s life, a decision that comes back to haunt Tully. There’s also an extended sub-plot in Fly Away involving Tully’s estranged mother, Dorothy, whose lifetime addictions to alcohol and marijuana lead Dorothy to another bed, this one at a rehabilitation center.

In her official bio, Hannah volunteers that she and her mother, who was hospitalized while suffering from cancer, spent two months together during that time co-authoring a historical romance that was not ready for prime time. A bed again took center stage for Hannah’s writing years ago when she was placed on five-months’ bed rest while pregnant with her son.

There’s a missive posted at Kristin Hannah’s Facebook page which says “Reminder: Your Girlfriends Will Probably Outlive Your Husband. So Find Good Ones.’ The actuarial tables say that’s generally what occurs in real life, but it wasn’t the case for the fictional Kate Ryan.