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Bob McMillanAn Opinion

By Bob McMillan
Presidents v. The Supreme Court

The recent political chatter about “Obamacare” before the Supreme Court of the United States got a great deal of media attention.  President Obama added fuel to the fire when he declared, “Ultimately, I am confident the Supreme Court will not take what would be an unprecedented, extraordinary step of overturning a law that was passed by a strong majority of a democratically elected Congress.”

For someone who was a law professor those words were absurd.  Even if a bill passed unanimously in the house and senate, it could still be overturned – if the law was in violation of the Constitution.


Michael Miller

Viewpoint

By Michael Miller
1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing

Nelson Rockefeller’s nomination for Governor in 1958 was partly an upstate revolt against the continued domination of party affairs by the Nassau Republican organization. Rockefeller was a man who always had bigger fish to fry, and throughout his almost 15 years as governor, he often went out of his way not to step on the toes of the touchy Nassau GOP. That’s why Nassau is the only large New York county without a state office building. Respect the turf.

Just before taking office, Rockefeller announced that State Senator William Hults would be Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, but not until the end of the 1959 legislative session, so that Glen Cove, North Hempstead, Oyster Bay and a sliver of Hempstead wouldn’t lose their Senate representation until 1960.


Mike BarryEye on the Island

By Mike Barry
The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’

The Nassau County district attorney’s (DA) office makes a cameo appearance in Empty Mansions, an incredible book about Huguette Clark (1906-2011), the Manhattan-raised heiress whose generosity and eccentricities were legendary.

Now that Ryan Murphy, a creator of television’s “Glee,” has optioned Empty Mansions’ film rights, I imagine a scrum of top actresses are vying to play Clark.


Complaining About Government

Over the years, I have written a couple of times relating to people complaining about politicians and the performance of government. The other day, I said to my audience, I have two questions. With the first question, I want you to raise your hand if you do not feel government is operating correctly.

Every hand in the audience was raised immediately!

My next question started with a request that no hands should be raised, and I asked the audience to just think about what I have asked. The question was, “Who has attended a Republican or Democratic political event in the last year?”

As I finished the question, several people in the audience squirmed in their seats and some looked at their spouse, speaking softly. Clearly, people complain and do not do anything to correct the complaints.

As I personally reflected on my two questions, I thought about the questions a little deeper than I had in the past. These thoughts were not a part of the discussion at the event. But, the more I thought about correcting what is wrong in our country – no matter what side of the political aisle you sit on – the deeper became my concern as to whether, today, it makes any difference in being a participant.

Do elected officials listen to their local political club? Does even making a political contribution make a difference anymore?

With 24/7 cable news, I wonder if the reporters asking questions have more influence than the average voter – even the voter who is active in the elected official’s own political party?

This column is not to put down participation. I still think that showing up in the right places can make a difference. As a volunteer, a person can get to know the people who do make a difference.

Another way to influence elected officials is through letter writing or emails to the official’s office – not just one letter. It takes many letters, and that is something you can do by organizing your friends, who are in agreement on an issue, to all write or email the elected official. As the letters pile up in an office, believe me, they get attention – particularly if they are all from the same area.

One final point. The number of lobbyists in our state and federal capitals are around your elected officials and their staffs day in and day out. You are not there with the same presence unless you get committed to make a difference. And that takes an effort, which many people are just not ready for at this present time.